You May Also Like

Why #MermaidThighs are trending on Instagram

Gina Rodriguez’s 4 simple wellness guidelines

Tom Brady now has his own line of vegan snacks

Forget happy hour—this TV anchor uses a workout app to bond with colleagues

This jet-setting (and healthy-living) model has some seriously good travel advice

8 things no one tells you about pursuing your passion

Holy bananas: Your favorite fruit might not be vegan anymore


By Deborah Dunham for Blisstree.com

First the good news: You know those brown-spotted, rotting bananas on your kitchen counter that you swear you’ll make banana bread with? You may not have to deal with them anymore.

Now the bad news: Those very same bananas may not be the vegan fruit you thought they were once you find out what’s on them.

Yesterday, scientists at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society revealed a new spray-on coating that could delay the ripening of bananas at home, in restaurants and in grocery stores. All of which sounds good at first, until you find out what’s in that “spray.”

The banana coating is made from chitosan, a substance derived from shrimp and crab shells. It works by killing bacteria that causes certain produce to rot. After they are picked, the banana’s pulp releases a chemical that boosts respiration, which then converts into the sugars that cause them to ripen so we can eat them. But, as that respiration continues, bananas become unpleasantly sweet and mushy if you don’t eat them within a couple of days.

For more about chitosan keep reading…

More reading from Blisstree.com:

The 6 scariest toxic beauty products experts would never touch
7 healthy back to school lunch ideas (that work for the office, too!)