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Jennifer Aniston’s yoga teacher explains her “Yogalosophy”

Jennifer Aniston and Mandy Ingber
Jennifer Aniston and Mandy Ingber at the book launch party. (Photo:

Mandy Ingber is known for teaching trikonasana to actresses like Jennifer Aniston, Brooke Shields, and Kate Beckinsale.

Now the LA-based instructor is  sharing her approach to yoga—which includes a dose of body-acceptance and a shot of athleticism—with non-celebs, in her new book, Yogalosophy: 28 Days to the Ultimate Mind-Body Makeover.

Ingber is going on a seven-city tour to promote the book, and she’ll be in New York at Pure Yoga on June 8 and 9 teaching a workshop. We caught up with her to find out what her “Yogalosophy” is all about:

Your book is a 28-day yoga plan. Is it for experienced yogis or newbies? First of all, it’s more than just a yoga book. It’s really geared towards the person that wants to have guidance and wants to find a way to basically exercise from a place of love. It’s good for people who want to incorporate yoga into a fitness program they already have or for people who are into yoga but want more fitness. It bridges the gap between yoga and fitness.

Is bridging that gap one of your goals? Yes, I grew up practicing yoga, but there was no community then, so I understand being intimidated by yoga. I’m also an athletic person, I was originally a spin instructor, so I like to move a lot, and I do get bored. When I created the hybrid, I felt like it incorporated both. The yoga poses are super simple, and the toners are familiar. But it is challenging, you will be sore the next day.

There’s a lot about body acceptance and body image in there too. Yes! It too me a long time to find my connection to yoga and my body. When I was younger, I was a body-obsessed person that wanted to be in perfect shape. I found that there was a punishment-reward cycle, this constant yo-yo-ing and unattainable expectations. This is for the woman who wants a different, more holistic approach. It’s a better way of looking at fitness—its’ not just about attaining a goal, it’s a lifestyle choice.

You have such high-profile Hollywood clients. Has working with celebs influenced your approach to yoga at all? To me, the celebrity doesn’t matter that much. A celebrity really is exactly like you or me—everyone has a body they need to take are of and stuff they’re going through. But I’ve introduced yoga to people who don’t want it to be really slow; they want it to be fitness-based. One example is Kate Beckinsale. She only likes to do yoga, but she needs to add strengtheners to tone her muscles and moves to stay in shape. There’s also the limited amount of time, they’re very busy. If you only have an hour, you have to squeeze a lot in. And the demand of the public, all of the sudden all eyes are on you and they want to know what is it that you’re doing that is unique, so I came up with my own “thing.” —Lisa Elaine Held