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How to “weigh” your accomplishments (instead of your body) at Grand Central Station


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Weigh this 4A wall covered in 244 scales is not exactly what you’d expect to see in Grand Central Station, but that’s what you’ll find on Monday and Tuesday of this week, in Vanderbilt Hall.

The scales are part of an installation created by Brooklyn-based artist Annica Lydenberg and commissioned by Lean Cuisine as part of its #Weighthis campaign, an initiative created to encourage women to weigh their accomplishments rather than their bodies when it comes to measuring their self-worth.

So, instead of pounds, the scales are painted with inspiring feats, like “finishing med school,” “raising three kids,” and “caring for others,” all of which were submitted by real women via social media. And Lydenberg is painting them in real time at Grand Central, so you can stop by and submit your own accomplishment to be added, until the wall is filled.

Yes, it’s of course all in the spirit of selling low-calorie frozen dinners, but #Weighthis is part of a larger Lean Cuisine re-brand. The company wants to shift their positioning away from dieting culture and present themselves as a healthy option for women who want to live well (similar to the shift Weight Watchers is attempting, with Oprah’s help), and they’ve made some surprisingly impressive changes to their ingredient lists towards that goal (like using lots of organic ingredients), too. “The Lean Cuisine brand relied on insights from hundreds of women as it evolved to reflect a shift in the way Americans— primarily women—are eating and shopping,” says marketing director Julie Lehman.

Whether or not the kale salad set will want to start microwaving their meals remains to be seen. But in the meantime, they can definitely appreciate the very cool message and visuals #Weighthis is creating. Click through for more shots of the installation. —Lisa Elaine Held

(Photos: Lisa Elaine Held for Well+Good)

 

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