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5 ways decluttering may bring more money into your life


marie-kondo-moneyWhen I wrote about the unexpected ways that Marie Kondo’s book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, changed my life, I thought that one or two Well+Good readers would corroborate how the anti-clutter guru had impacted them for the better.

What I didn’t expect was the outpouring of interest in just how this book motivated me to pay back a $10,000 check that I owed an ex.

So what was my secret? The long of it is that life is a paradox in so many ways: The more we let go of, the more we open our arms to. Benjamins included.

For me, decluttering was the trigger that made me realize I was ready to pay off my credit card debt and pay back my ex. It created room for openness, clarity—and some more money.

And it could do the same for you, too. Here is what I believe to be the five magical connections between decluttering and “finding” money:

tidying_up_kondo_check

1. Sometimes it’s a matter of seeing things differently
When we empower ourselves through something as simple as decluttering, it can also shift our perception and clear some internal blocks we have around things like money. In my case, I realized that I had more than I thought, because I felt the truth of my abundance. As I released things in my physical environment, I released any feelings of not having enough. You may even start to notice unnecessary purchases after you’ve cleared your space; not only will you keep just what “sparks joy,” in the words of Kondo, but you’ll also get in that mindset as you go shopping. The end result? You could end up saving money each month for something you really want, like a plane ticket to the beach.

2. Self-care has a ripple effect
Taking care of ourselves comes in many different forms, and when we tend to one area of our lives it has a ripple effect on all other areas of our lives. As I cleaned up my living space and felt free and clear in that area, I naturally felt the desire to feel free in every other area of my life. Before too long, I was ready to tackle my credit card debt and that lingering IOU to my ex.

3. Everything is energy, so what is “lost” might then be gained
“Stuff” is energy and it can block the natural flow of what is trying to come in and flow back out. When we clear a physical block in our environment—as well as mental and emotional blocks in ourselves—and connect that with empowered actions and choices in our lives (like paying off debt or even just committing to a consistent monthly payment plan), we clear the blocks to abundance. The month I cleared out papers and paid off debt was one of my biggest income months in my business.

4. Less is more
The new luxury is simplicity. When we let go of things that are unnecessary in our lives (even though we think we “need” them or we feel guilty for releasing them) we create space for the real thing. Something we truly desire—whether it’s something as small as a dress or as important as a new relationship.

5. Transformation happens through loss—so be okay with it
I’ve worked hard at clearing out both the internal and the external blocks to my happiness and freedom. And every transformative shift has included loss. Loss of old, limiting beliefs I held onto; loss of fears; loss of relationships, things, jobs. But each time they all help me realize more of who I really was, what really mattered to me, and to live a more purpose-driven life, all of which creates new abundance in all forms. —Jennifer Kass

Ready to Marie Kondo your place? Here are our biggest takeaways from the bestselling book.

(Photo: Bill Miles)