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Photo: Alex Holyoake/Unsplash
Photo: Alex Holyoake/Unsplash

We are women, hear us roar, right?

But sometimes, the last thing we want to do at the end of an exceptionally busy day of work (not to mention one filled with an early a.m. workout, a healthy not-sad desk lunch that was made from scratch, a BFF who needed to be talked through personal drama, and a bit of meditation on an overcrowded subway) is summon the energy to eke out a roar. We live in a world where trying to have it all is commonplace—and taking a legit lunch break is not. So where does that leave us?

According to Fast Company, it has many of us burning out—and leaving the workplace—before we’re even a decade out of college. A study by McKinsey & Co. reveals that women account for 53 percent of corporate entry-level jobs, but only 37 percent of mid-management roles and 26 percent of vice president and senior management positions.

And it’s not because women are ditching office life to start families—only 11 percent choose to leave the workforce permanently to have children, according to the McKinsey study.

Instead, they’re exhausted to the point that they have to take a step back to reevaluate their lives by the age of 30, Fast Company reports. And it’s becoming really common. (So if you feel like stress is walloping you like Miley’s wrecking ball, you’re not alone.)

Why? “We are in unprecedented times in terms of the global, always-on organization,” ex-Googler Jenny Blake told Fast Company. “Work comes in at all hours, and it can be hard to create boundaries that keep it contained and allow for proper rest and renewal.”

On top of that, women are expected (fairly or not) to serve double duty, taking care of the home and our relationships, and according to Fast Company the burnout also stems from millennials being unhappy at work and feeling lost.

The solution? Blake and other 30-ish women are finding that the answer is to take that break, ease up on expectations, and become way more mindful about career moves (don’t take the job you’re not 100 percent psyched about). In other words, show yourself a little more love. How else will you get that roar back to deafening levels?

Stress: got some? (Same.) These foam roller exercises are amazing for reducing stress, and if you want to really go for it, there’s always sensory deprivation tanks.