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3 super healthy recipes from Australia’s super cool Bondi Beach


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best healthy recipesBondi Beach, in Sydney, Australia, has become a global shorthand for living a healthy, active lifestyle. (Boho outfit optional.) Picture an easygoing community filled with surfers and fitness-lovers, yoga and wellness centers, and cool, cutting-edge healthy cafes that lead the way in local, seasonal, and sustainable cuisine—and have long before it started trending in the Western Hemisphere, btw.

So it makes a bit more sense that when a couple of Bondi boys created a series of short “guerrilla cooking” videos—a chef with a camp stove on rooftops, beaches, and boat ramps—it drew a global fan base, earning more than a million views in 18 months. (Their attractiveness may have been a factor, too.)

The Bondi Harvest project started when Guy Turland was a chef at a North Bondi café called Depot, where his cooking ethos was, “How can I make healthy bloody tasty?” His collaborator, filmmaker Mark Alston, was out to convey how cuisine fosters community via recipes to be shared with friends and family. “We’d love nothing more than to think there could be kitchens, barbecues and parties right around the globe dishing out our Bondi-inspired food,” he says.

Now their foodspo-heavy cookbook, Bondi Harvest (available for pre-order), will be published Stateside in April, making that possible. Recipes aren’t terribly complicated, and dishes—from Instagram-worthy “breaky bowls” and seasonal salads to desserts—succeed at making healthy “bloody tasty.”

We asked Turland and Alston to give us a taste of trendy, healthy Bondi cooking for your dining table, right now. Here are three of their favorite recipes… —Ann Abel

(Photos: Bondi Harvest)

 

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best healthy recipesKale Shakshuka

“We love making this shakshuka in one big pan and serving it on the table for people to help themselves. But you can prepare it in individual ramekins—put the tomato mixture into the ramekins and crack an egg or two on top, then bake in a 350°F oven for 10 minutes or until the egg is cooked.”

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 onion, finely diced
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 red pepper, finely diced
2 long red chilies, finely diced
2 tablespoons tomato paste (concentrated purée)
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 teaspoon smoky paprika
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 pound diced or crushed canned tomatoes
½ teaspoon brown sugar
1 bunch kale, stalks removed and finely sliced
6 eggs
1 small handful parsley sprigs
fresh crusty bread, to serve

Heat the oil in a medium heavy-based frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, red pepper and chili. Cook for 3–5 minutes, or until tender and slightly caramelized. Add the tomato paste, paprika and cumin and cook for 1 minute, or until fragrant. Add the tomato and sugar, and stir to combine. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for 15–20 minutes.

Add the kale and stir through the tomato sauce. Crack the eggs one by one into the tomato mixture in the pan. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 5 minutes, or until the eggs are cooked the way you like. Scatter over the parsley, season with salt and pepper, and serve with fresh crusty bread.

 

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best healthy recipesWild Rice, Pickled Zucchini, Dukkah & Mozzarella Salad

“There are so many different grains and rices out there; don’t be afraid to try something new. Wild rice is fast becoming one of my favorites—just cook it like any other rice, and it develops a super tasty earthy and nutty flavor, and adds a cool texture to salads.” [Editor’s note: Dukkah, also known as duqqa, is an Egyptian condiment made of ground nuts, herbs, and spices.]

1 cup cooked wild rice
1 large handful mint, leaves picked
10. oz mozzarella

Quick Pickled Zucchini
5 oz. white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
½ red chili, minced (keep the seeds if you like it hot)
2 whole cloves
1 cinnamon stick
2 cups diced zucchini

Dukkah Breadcrumbs
1 cup hazelnuts, finely chopped
2/3 cup sesame seeds
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
1 tablespoon ground cumin
zest of 1 lemon
2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon sea salt
10 oz. olive oil
½ loaf old bread, cut into 1 ¼-inch cubes

To make the quick pickled zucchini, put the white wine vinegar in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the honey, chili, cloves and cinnamon stick and bring to a simmer. Allow to simmer for 5 minutes, then remove the saucepan from heat and add zucchini. Set aside to infuse.

Meanwhile, make the dukkah breadcrumbs. Preheat the oven to 350. Put the hazelnuts, sesame seeds, coriander seeds, cumin, lemon zest, pepper and salt in a small bowl and mix to combine. This is your dukkah mixture. Scoop 5 tablespoons of it into a large bowl, add the olive oil and mix well. (Put any remaining dukkah mixture in an airtight container to use as a garnish and for later.)

Add the bread to the large bowl and toss with your hands until well coated with the dukkah and oil mixture. Scatter the bread over a baking tray and cook for 15–20 minutes, until golden, moving the bread around every 5 minutes to prevent it burning. Set aside to cool slightly.

To make the salad, strain the pickled zucchini and transfer to a large bowl with the wild rice, dukkah breadcrumbs and mint. Toss to combine and transfer to a serving bowl. Tear the mozzarella with your fingers and scatter over the salad. Garnish with a sprinkle of the remaining dukkah and serve.

 

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best healthy recipesHerb-Crusted Chicken Roulade with Quinoa Salad

“This recipe is great for two things: cooking super succulent chicken, and impressing friends with your French cooking skills! Just remember, the key to perfect poached chicken is to put your chicken into cold water and bring the water to a simmer slowly. It should take about 25–30 minutes to bring it to a simmer.”

1 chicken breast
1 large handful parsley, leaves picked
1 large handful cilantro, leaves picked
2 long red chilies, finely chopped
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
sea salt, for sprinkling
5 button mushrooms, finely chopped
1 avocado, chopped, to serve
1 tomato, chopped, to serve

Quinoa
7 oz. quinoa
2 cups chicken stock
1 garlic clove, coarsely chopped
2 red chilies, coarsely chopped
2 bay leaves

To make quinoa, in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, bring quinoa, stock, garlic, chili and bay leaves to a boil. Simmer 12–15 minutes, or until quinoa is tender.

Meanwhile, to make chicken roulade, butterfly the chicken breast by cutting through it horizontally, but not all the way through. Flatten it out and lay it on a few layers of plastic wrap on a flat surface. Fold the plastic wrap over the chicken and roll a rolling pin over it until it is just under ½ inch thick.

In a bowl, mix the parsley, coriander, chili and garlic. Spread the herb mix over a flat surface and sprinkle with sea salt. Unwrap the chicken and put the plastic wrap to one side. Lay the chicken flat over the herb mix, and press it into the mix to coat it well on one side. Place the chicken back on the plastic wrap, herbed side down, place mushrooms in the center, and roll the chicken around the mushrooms. Twist the ends of the plastic wrap to secure, and then wrap it in foil.

Place foil-wrapped roulade in a medium saucepan with cold water and heat over medium-low heat to bring to a gentle simmer. Simmer for 5 minutes. Remove roulade from the water and rest it in its wrappings for about 15 minutes.

Unwrap the foil, slice off one end of the plastic wrap and squeeze the roulade out. Slice into 1-inch slices. Serve with quinoa, avocado and tomato.

Need more dinner ideas? How about putting it in a bowl, whipping up this vegan kale burger that’s become an obsession, or one these 5 recipes from the new “Bulletproof Cookbook” (no coffee mug needed)…