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New York City’s new bone broth subscription service


Bone Broth
(Photo: Bone Deep and Harmony)

After falling hard for the health benefits of bone broth, two New York City yoga teachers decided to start selling it—and now a subscription gets you a few quarts each week to pick up on your way to work.

Bone Deep and Harmony (children of the ’90s, like me, will appreciate this clever name) was created by Taylor Chen and Lya Mojica this past summer after the pair realized they were both making it at home—and before everyone in the city started talking about the of-the-moment elixir.

Mojica grew up sipping broth during her childhood in Mexico, and Chen says she was turned on to it by her husband, an acupuncturist who would prescribe it to his clients for all manner of ailments. “We started offering it just to my husband’s patients, just as an experimental market,” she says, “and it did really well, and that’s when we decided to make it a legitimate business.”

Bone Broth
Company founders Taylor Chen and Lya Mojica. (Photo: Bone Deep and Harmony)

The pair partnered with Harlem Shambles, a local uptown butcher shop that took their recipe and started whipping up the bone broth in-house, using local, grass-fed beef bones.

Currently, customers can purchase monthly, seasonal, or annual subscriptions, all of which come with three quarts of broth per week, which you pick up on Wednesdays in Chelsea or Mt. Kisco in Westchester. The quarts come frozen, and Chen says it will last at least four months that way.

bone broth
(Photo: Bone Deep & Harmony)

They’re only offering the beef broth right now, but Chen says they’ll most likely branch out to chicken, fish, and lamb options soon. And they’re looking to graduate from being an indie subscription service to a bigger pot in the kitchen, too. “Eventually we’d love to see our broths in Whole Foods and all the corner marts around town, so it’s more accessible to people,” says Chen. And if the bone broth craze keeps on picking up steam, it certainly seems like there will be an appetite for it. —Lisa Elaine Held

For more information, visit www.bonedeepandharmony.com