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The first cold-pressed juice directory debuts

Juice Directory

Today, go-to organic food blogger Max Goldberg, of Living Maxwell, debuted an entirely new website—an online directory for getting your green juice fix on the go.

The Pressed Organic Juice Directory is Goldberg’s comprehensive map of places that sell organic, cold-pressed juices across the country. It’s the first resource of its kind, and includes 700 juice spots across all 50 states (and even Canada, England, France, and Puerto Rico).

“In some cities, Yelp will give you 30 or 60 percent of the places that exist,” Goldberg says, in explaining his inspiration for the site. “Some places it’s pressed and not organic, some it’s organic and not pressed. I eat all organic, and when I travel, I want to know where to get juice.”

Goldberg used his own expertise from years of writing about food and juice brands to master the juice geography, and while his primary aim is to help users find kale-cucumber concoctions, he also wants to shine a light on stores and brands that are lesser known. “I’m going to help some of these small companies who are not on the radar,” he says. “Everyone knows Organic Avenue, but you may not know about Tiny Empire and Magic Mix Juicery.” He also adds “comments from Max” on the pages of businesses he knows well, to offer guidance in your juice pursuits.

To be included in the directory, stores must sell at least one cold-pressed, organic green juice, with organic meaning that 95 percent of the ingredients have to be organic, the same standard established by the USDA for certification. (You’ll notice the absence of brands like Pressed Juicery and Evolution Fresh for that reason.)

On the simple website, locations are listed by state and city, with a map. It doesn’t include sophisticated features that allow you to sort by different variables, but it does include a list of all brands that will provide overnight juice delivery anywhere in the country, and there’s blog with juicy news and features.

Goldberg says the launch is just the beginning, and individual store pages and comments will be expanded as the site grows. Which it’s sure to do as the juice boom continues. “The biggest challenge in creating it,” he admits,” is that new places are being added every single day.” —Lisa Elaine Held