You May Also Like

What causes neck pain and stiffness? "Text neck"

We all suffer from “text neck”—here’s how to fix it and the migraines it causes

Rihanna makeup tutorial for bronzer uses

The one product Rihanna’s makeup artist says will glow up your face *and* body

How book a vacation like Lea Michele

Lea Michele’s 4 tips for planning your most transformative vacation yet

5 top Beauty Tools Amazon Prime Deals

The 4 best beauty tools to snag on Amazon Prime Day

On-sale shower products you shouldn't have to live without

15 on-sale products from Target to turn your shower from blah to spa

These are the least stressed cities in the USA

And the most and least stressed cities in the country are…

Workouts can be a literal walk in the park, according to the best scientific research ever


Thumbnail for Workouts can be a literal walk in the park, according to the best scientific research ever
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Jesse Morrow

After grinding away at your desk for nine hours straight, going on a post-work walk (especially with your canine bestie) can be a great way to shake off the day and get in some exercise. If you’re anything like me, though, there’s always a nagging voice in the back of your mind wondering whether the mind-clearing steps actually count as a workout. Well, according to one recent study, the simple answer is yes, you can count the outing as a sweat sesh—as long as you meet the speed limit, that is.

For the report published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers compiled 38 recent studies that included data on participants’ walking speed, heart rate and respiration, age, and BMI so that they could compare the information and find correlations between walking practices and health. Their results pinpointed that 100 steps per minute (or 2.7 miles per hour) is the magic minimum for your walk cadence to reach moderate-intensity exercise—AKA activity that gets your heart rate up by 50 to 70 percent. Break it down, and that comes to about 1.7 steps a second. Sounds like a pretty crushable goal, right?

Results showed that 100 steps per minute is the magic minimum for your walk cadence to reach moderate-intensity exercise—AKA activity that gets your heart rate up by 50 to 70 percent.

That rate is a safe bet for anyone younger than 60, as study co-author Catrine Tudor-Locke, PhD, tells The New York Times. But since the current federal recommendation for exercise is a half hour every day, note that you need to set a goal time, just as you would for a marathon, to ensure you clock in 3,000 steps or more in that time period. If the strict guideline is making your heart race already, have no fear, because Dr. Tudor-Locke says “this pace will probably not feel strenuous to most healthy people.”

To kick up your intensity a notch, the researchers say you should increase your minute rate to 130 steps in order for your workouts to officially count as “vigorous.” But if after a particularly grueling day, you’d rather keep it simple and low-key, clocking 100 steps per minute will still do good for your body. So a solid workout can actually be a walk in the park.

If you’re wondering how long your runs should be, this is a useful guide. And here’s why the 10,000-steps-a-day paradigm isn’t effective for boosting your metabolism.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

How book a vacation like Lea Michele

Lea Michele’s 4 tips for planning your most transformative vacation yet

Best healthy tech finds on Amazon Prime Day

Save *big* on 9 healthy-living tech must-haves this Amazon Prime Day

5 top Beauty Tools Amazon Prime Deals

The 4 best beauty tools to snag on Amazon Prime Day

Oranges help macular degeneration prevention

Logging some serious screen time? Eat *this* fruit to keep your vision game strong

On-sale shower products you shouldn't have to live without

15 on-sale products from Target to turn your shower from blah to spa

These are the least stressed cities in the USA

And the most and least stressed cities in the country are…