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Don’t feel like you have a Type A *or* B personality? Well, C and D also exist


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Typically, when it comes to describing someone’s personality type, we rely heavily on two nearly opposite categories: Type A and B. The former is characterized as highly organized, ambitious, and competitive; and the latter is known for procrastination, sociability, laid-back vibes, and creativity. However, especially considering the world comprises more than 7.4 billion people, not everyone neatly falls into that pair of cut-and-dry definitions—and that’s where two often-overlooked types come in: Types C and D.

According to Psychology Today, Type Cs—AKA “conscientious” individuals—tend to be, like Type As, incredibly organized and hardworking, but they don’t necessarily prioritize getting things done as quickly as possible. Instead, the focus is more centered on accuracy and quality.

Type Cs—AKA “conscientious” individuals—tend to be incredibly organized and hardworking, but they don’t have the urge to get things done as quickly as possible like Type As.

Type Ds—or “distressed” individuals—are often afraid of rejection and can be “anxious, lonely, and perhaps even traumatized, all of which causes their mental health to suffer,” writes Susan Krauss Whitbourne, PhD. But if you fall into this category, don’t worry: A Type D personality doesn’t automatically lead to serious conditions like depression or anxiety (although that’s certainly a possibility). Rather, people in that category tend to suppress negative emotions, which puts them at a higher risk of health issues like cardiovascular disease. (And, just FYI, 21 percent of the population falls into the category, according to a 2006 study.)

Obviously, these types aren’t one-size-fits-all, especially when it comes to defining the entire global population. In fact, you may feel like you’re a bit of each (it’s possible to relate to all four main characters on Sex and the City, right?). Some days you’re a total #girlboss who’s slaying all the projects on her plate, and other times you might just drop everything to retreat to your room and watch Netflix. Remember, you define your personality type, and it’s probably more complex and nuanced than limiting parameters allow for.

Find out if your personality type should dictate your diet. Or, here’s what your personality type means for your love language.

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