A DIY essential oils recipe for muscle soreness

If you're not a fan of arnica, you can make your own muscle soother with clean, essential oils.

By Rebecca Bailey for NoMoreDirtyLooks.com

For many years, I used arnica gel for muscle soreness, and it worked fine but I wasn’t completely satisfied. The one I used was pretty clean, I think, but I thought essential oils might be a better (and cleaner) solution. Plus, the gel is so cold going on and that first moment of application made me cringe. I’ve been working on this EO recipe for a while, and now have a blend I’m pleased with in both performance and scent. It’s a multi-tasker too, which I certainly value.

Vetiver, 20 drops – immediate relief, chronic conditions
Sandalwood, 20 drops – immediate relief
Lavender, 10 drops – strains/spasms
Litsea, 5 drops – immediate relief
Grapefruit, 15 drops – continued recovery
Fennel, 10 drops – chronic conditions
Peppermint, 10 drops – immediate relief, chronic conditions
Clary Sage, 5 drops – strains/spasms
Helichrysum, 5 drops – continued recovery

Drop the EOs in a 2oz amber glass dropper bottle, then fill it up with grapeseed oil.

Tip the bottle back and forth or roll it to blend. Easy, and it really works!

Keep reading for more uses and recipes…

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