You May Also Like

The vegan poke bowl recipe secret ingredient

Make vegan poké taste like the real thing, thanks to one dietitian-approved simple trick

how to be single and happy

5 science-backed tips for being single and happy—even if you *really* want a partner

farmers' market

A dietitian shares her secrets to getting the best produce at the farmers’ market

An expert says how often should I wash my face

Why it’s just as important to wash your face in the morning as at night

How to use lemongrass essential oil for cleaning

Watch your back, baking soda: This multitasking DIY cleaning ingredient is about to be *everywhere*

Horoscope of the day eclipse mercury retrograde

There’s *another* eclipse this week (oh, and btw Mercury’s going retrograde)—here’s how to cope

Why you shouldn’t be surprised if you’re newly allergic to a dish at Thanksgiving this year


Thumbnail for Why you shouldn’t be surprised if you’re newly allergic to a dish at Thanksgiving this year
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Alberto Bogo

Children aren’t the only ones who develop random food allergies. A new study found the severe intolerances pop up in adults too—and a lot more often than you’d probably guess.

“Food allergies are often seen as a condition that begins in childhood, so the idea that 45 percent of adults with food allergies develop them in adulthood is surprising.” —Ruchi Gupta, MD

Findings presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology’s annual meeting showed that nearly half of adults with food allergies reported one or more came about during their adult years. “Food allergies are often seen as a condition that begins in childhood, so the idea that 45 percent of adults with food allergies develop them in adulthood is surprising,” lead study author Ruchi Gupta, MD, said in a press release. “We also saw that, as with children, the incidence of food allergies in adults is rising across all ethnic groups.”

Maybe less surprisingly, the most common allergy that comes about during adulthood is shellfish, which affects 3.6 percent of the country. Next up is an allergy to tree nuts, which targets an estimated 1.8 percent of the country.

As for the prevalence of allergies in different ethnic groups, the risk was higher for those who aren’t white, with black, Asian, and Hispanic adults reporting new allergies at a rate more than two times high than white adults for popular culprits like peanuts and shellfish, according to co-author food-allergy researcher Christopher Warren.

If you’re having a weird reaction to a food, Warren noted it’s always smart to get tested—even if you think it’s just a slight intolerance. Because, evidently, no matter your age, you’re not safe from the onset of food allergies. Sounds like great Thanksgiving-dinner conversation—as you hesitantly pass around the pie—right?

Here’s exactly what a dairy-free foodie stocks in her fridge. Not a fan of eggs? These protein-packed breakfasts don’t even need ’em.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

An expert says how often should I wash my face

Why it’s just as important to wash your face in the morning as at night

chips and guac

Mentioning guacamole in your dating profile might increase your love luck

The vegan poke bowl recipe secret ingredient

Make vegan poké taste like the real thing, thanks to one dietitian-approved simple trick

How to keep shower curtains from sticking to you

The easiest way to keep your shower curtain liner from clinging to you, once and for all

Is chocolate milk better than sports drinks?

Science says chocolate milk has major exercise recovery cred—but is it *actually* the best option?

Are foodborne illness outbreaks on the rise?

Are foodborne illnesses on the rise, or what?