You May Also Like

5 picks from the Sarah Jessica Parker book club

Can’t help but wonder what’s on Sarah Jessica Parker’s summer reading list? Check it out here

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

courteney cox beauty

4 things Courteney Cox does daily to bring out her inner beauty

Well+Good - What #CareerGoals Means in 2018

What #CareerGoals Means in 2018

how often to get a massage

Go ahead, book a massage: This is how often you should get a rubdown to reap the benefits

avocado honey face mask

Your beloved avocado is just as potent in this 2-ingredient face mask as it is delish

Even if you’re just getting your genes tested for fun, it could cost you later


Thumbnail for Even if you’re just getting your genes tested for fun, it could cost you later
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Victor Torres

Given how easy it is to test your genes right at home, it seems like so many more people are giving the option a shot. The results can provide some baseline insights on markers like how you should exercise according to your DNA and your risk of getting breast cancer. But while knowing more about yourself on this deeper, diagnostic level can be totally useful and potentially life-saving, the info could also cost you in an unsuspecting way down the line.

According to NPR, results from genetic testing—whether conducted in lighthearted fun to get the 411 about your ancestors or for health reasons—can be used by insurance companies, potentially altering the price you pay…and even compromising whether you’re eligible for coverage at all. While the Federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act doesn’t allow general insurers to factor your genetic info into your typical health coverage, the companies can use it down the line when you’re ready to sign up for long-term care policies, life, or disability insurance. And yep, even services as innocent as 23andMe play a role.

Insurers can’t factor your genetic testing results into your typical health insurance coverage, but they can use it down the line when you’re ready to sign up for long-term care policies like life or disability insurance.

If you undergo genetic testing after already having an insurance policy, the results won’t play into the coverage you get or the price you pay. But experts say you’re typically legally obligated if asked to disclose your genetic testing results when applying, since the information is considered medically relevant information.

So, it might be fun and telling to learn what your DNA says about you, but for the sake of your bank account and coverage options, you might want to draft a pro-con list before spitting into that tube.

Would you take a blood test to see how long you have to live? Or, find out why one woman’s genetic test led her to getting a double mastectomy.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

courteney cox beauty

4 things Courteney Cox does daily to bring out her inner beauty

avocado honey face mask

Your beloved avocado is just as potent in this 2-ingredient face mask as it is delish

common skin issues

The weird—but not worrisome—skin issues that develop after 30

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

Try a low carb oatmeal recipe using cauliflower

Make your cozy bowl of oatmeal low-carb by swapping in a super-surprising star ingredient

What does organic mean in food? It depends

The key distinction between “made with organic” and “organic” food labels you *really* need to know