You May Also Like

Sorry, tall girls: Your height increases your chances of dealing with varicose veins

The weird way being tall increases your chances of getting varicose veins

how to tell if you're dehydrated

Figure out whether you’re dehydrated in seconds by stepping on a super-smart scale

Why you feel like you have to pee during sex

Women worry a lot about peeing during sex—but how often does that even happen?

Relationship wisdom from love guru Esther Perel

3 pieces of modern relationship wisdom from rock star psychotherapist Esther Perel

How to improve confidence

Boost your confidence in 4 steps—even when you think your reflection looks like the Corpse Bride

Weight Watchers news: The brand changed to WW

From Weight Watchers to WW: How the global weight-loss company is evolving into a full wellness brand

The scientific reason to eat your Thanksgiving dinner slowly


Thumbnail for The scientific reason to eat your Thanksgiving dinner slowly
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Cameron Whitman

Being surrounded by so much food on Thanksgiving probably only makes you want to do one thing: Make like a turkey, and gobble through your meal. But there’s a scientific reason to slow down at this year’s feast.

While it can be hard to pace yourself when your food is ridiculously delicious, the American Heart Association discovered slow eaters are less likely to become obese or develop metabolic syndrome—which can increase your risk factors for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke—compared to those who shovel in their meals.

After five years of analyzing the eating speeds of 642 men and 441 women, researchers found fast eaters to be 11.6 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome compared to 6.5 percent of normal eaters and 2.3 percent of slow eaters. Additionally, fast eaters tended to weigh more, have a higher blood sugar level, and sport a larger waistline.

“When people eat fast, they tend not to feel full and are more likely to overeat. Eating fast causes bigger glucose fluctuation, which can lead to insulin resistance.” —Takayuki Yamaji, MD

“Eating more slowly may be a crucial lifestyle change to help prevent metabolic syndrome,” said study author Takayuki Yamaji, MD, in the press release. “When people eat fast, they tend not to feel full and are more likely to overeat. Eating fast causes bigger glucose fluctuation, which can lead to insulin resistance.”

How can you prevent the occurrence of speed-eating–related damage? Make it your mission to slow down—and according to one doc, that means taking at least 30 minutes to finish your meal.

And while you’re at it, eat mindfully: “Eat in a situation where it’s conducive to eating. If it’s at your desk, you really need to not work at the same time you eat,” Nieca Goldberg, MD, NYU Langone cardiologist, told Time. “Even if it’s as short as a half hour, it’s better than doing it in 10 minutes while you’re answering your emails.”

Not only will slowing down enable you to really taste and enjoy your meal, but it will also help you stay healthy in the process. And, don’t worry—there’s more than enough pumpkin pie to go around.

Here’s your definitive day-by-day guide to Thanksgiving prep. Also, this is the one pantry staple you need for the holidays.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

Relationship wisdom from love guru Esther Perel

3 pieces of modern relationship wisdom from rock star psychotherapist Esther Perel

Weight Watchers news: The brand changed to WW

From Weight Watchers to WW: How the global weight-loss company is evolving into a full wellness brand

do we need carbs

Low-carb diets are trending—do we even need the macronutrient at all?

How to improve confidence

Boost your confidence in 4 steps—even when you think your reflection looks like the Corpse Bride

Should you be taking a sulfur supplement?

Everyone is LA is buzzing about sulfur supplements––here’s everything you need to know

Ever heard of desk yoga? It can help your back

4 chair yoga moves that treat back pain sustained from slouching at your desk job