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Food and love: How they’re linked in the brain


Food and love: How they are linked in the brain

Via HuffingtonPost.com

We’ve all had that friend who disappears for a month, only to emerge newly coupled and minus ten pounds. Or the friend who gets hitched and then develops a belly.

What appears to be an individual phenomenon is actually deep seated in our social and psychological behavior. Food and love are inexorably linked, thanks to a complex hormonal reaction that affects our emotional attachments to loved ones—and our need for food.

Notably, early in the relationship, eating takes on weighted significance, according to Maryanne Fisher, a professor of psychology St. Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, whose research focuses on the evolutionary basis of romantic behavior. “Food is a way to display skills to a potential mate,” Fisher told HuffPost Healthy Living. “You might buy nicer food, prepare better meals. It’s fascinating how it can be used as part of the relationship.”

Keep reading to find out how relationships affect eating habits…

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