You May Also Like

year of the dog chinese new year

Happy Lunar New Year! Here are 5 things you need to know about the Year of the Dog

Secrets of people who never get sick

5 secrets for staying healthy this cold and flu season

Why to brush your dog's teeth every day

Yes, you’re supposed to brush your dog’s teeth every day—here’s why

The connection between postpartum depression and gut health

The surprising connection between gut health and postpartum depression

Can you be friends with your boss?

Can you be friends with your boss (and should you)?

Social media doesn't hinder relationships

Social media may not hinder millennial relationships IRL after all

High intensity interval training found to lower your appetite


The workout you've grown to love (and sometimes hate ) might cause you to eat less, says a study.
(Photo: Daphnie Yang)
A HIIT workout with Daphnie Yang. (Photo: Daphnie Yang)

There’s a long-standing idea that working out hard boosts your appetite. But a study begs to differ. High intensity interval training (HIIT), the workout you’ve grown to love (and sometimes hate), might actually cause you to eat less.

A study done at the University of Western Australia, and now getting buzz outside academia and in the fitness world, found that interval training suppresses the hunger-stimulating hormone, ghrelin. It also increases levels of blood lactate and blood glucose, which squash your short-term appetite.

The study was based on a group of overweight men who completed 30 minutes of intense intervals versus those who performed moderate exercise. And guess which group ate fewer calories? Team HIIT.

So the next time you’re settling into your trillionth squat jump at the Fhitting Room, Barry’s Bootcamp, or in Equinox’s Tabata, Metcon3, or Whipped, just say to yourself “delayed gratification…” —Molly Gallagher