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High intensity interval training found to lower your appetite


The workout you've grown to love (and sometimes hate ) might cause you to eat less, says a study.
(Photo: Daphnie Yang)
A HIIT workout with Daphnie Yang. (Photo: Daphnie Yang)

There’s a long-standing idea that working out hard boosts your appetite. But a study begs to differ. High intensity interval training (HIIT), the workout you’ve grown to love (and sometimes hate), might actually cause you to eat less.

A study done at the University of Western Australia, and now getting buzz outside academia and in the fitness world, found that interval training suppresses the hunger-stimulating hormone, ghrelin. It also increases levels of blood lactate and blood glucose, which squash your short-term appetite.

The study was based on a group of overweight men who completed 30 minutes of intense intervals versus those who performed moderate exercise. And guess which group ate fewer calories? Team HIIT.

So the next time you’re settling into your trillionth squat jump at the Fhitting Room, Barry’s Bootcamp, or in Equinox’s Tabata, Metcon3, or Whipped, just say to yourself “delayed gratification…” —Molly Gallagher