Well+Good

This is the one thing you shouldn’t do on your first day at a new job, according to a career expert

Photo: Stocksy/Lumina

After starting a new job, you might feel like you need to impress your new colleagues and proceed to share (or rather, overshare) everything about yourself, like your accomplishments and latest epic adventure. But according to one career expert, unleashing your life story right off the bat is actually the last thing you should do at a new gig.

“To start gaining respect of colleagues and superiors on the first day, make it about them, not about you.” —Jason Sackett, executive coach and author

Instead of prattling on about your (ridiculously cute) dog and career achievements, ask your new coworkers about themselves first: “To start gaining respect of colleagues and superiors on the first day, make it about them, not about you,” Jason Sackett, an executive coach and contributing author to Compassion@Work: Creating Workplaces that Engage the Human Spirit, told Glassdoor.

Because you’re a new face in their space, talking about yourself tends to result only in making people feel nervous or annoyed. That’s why Sackett said your best bet to start off strong in your new workspace is to become a great listener. “Get curious and inquire about the roles, talents, and achievements of your colleagues to establish a persona as a listener, learner, and collaborator,” he said.

By shifting your focus and making it clear you’re there to learn from others—not just to talk about yourself—you’re more likely to put everyone at ease and develop a trusting relationship with people in the office. And don’t worry: You’ll be showing your new work BFFs pictures of your cuddly pup soon enough.

Here’s Michelle Obama’s one piece of advice to aspiring #bossbabe leaders. And if you’re not happy in your career, this path could change that.