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Recipe: Jivamuktea Café’s Spirulina Millet


The perfect side dish for your next vegan dinner party, from Sharon Gannon's new cookbook, Simple Recipes for Joy.
Spirulina Millet recipe, Simple Recipes for Joy, Jivamukti
(Photo: Simple Recipes for Joy)

Jivamukti co-founder Sharon Gannon has been a formidable presence in yoga and veganism for the past 30 years, but Simple Recipes for Joy, out September 16, marks her very first cookbook.

“I have to admit I was quite naive,” Gannon says. “I didn’t realize until after the cookbook was finished that you don’t have to make up every single part of each recipe yourself. A lot of pies went into the compost!”

Luckily, Gannon had some help from the chefs at Jivamuktea Café, the vegan cafe and juice bar inside New York City’s Jivamukti Yoga location on Broadway and 13th Street. In addition to recipes that Gannon makes all the time at her home in Woodstock, New York, many of the recipes are taken from the cafe—including the spirulina millet. (Spirulina is a blue-green algae and superfood.)

Use it as a side dish or as a spread on toast “where the taste evokes an aged cheese,” she says.

“This is Jivamuktea Café’s signature dish,” Gannon writes in the book. “You won’t find this at any other restaurant because I developed it in my own kitchen and have been serving it to dinner guests—including my cats—for about thirty years.”

Gannon explains her belief in sharing food with animals, and more about her veganism, ethos, and new cookbook, in this interview. —Jamie McKillop

Jivamuktea Café’s Spirulina Millet
Makes two to four servings

1 cup uncooked millet
¼ cup flaxseed oil
¼ cup powdered spirulina
1 tablespoon soy sauce, tamari, or Braggs Liquid Aminos

Let the millet sit uncovered after cooking for about 10 minutes so it dries out some, then transfer it to a large bowl. Add the flaxseed oil and, using a large fork, mix well to coat the millet. Little by little, add the spirulina, using the fork to mix. Add the soy sauce, mixing well until the millet is bright green.

For more information, visit www.jivamuktiyoga.com and check out Simple Recipes for Joy

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