You May Also Like

How to keep shower curtains from sticking to you

The easiest way to keep your shower curtain liner from clinging to you, once and for all

An expert says how often should I wash my face

Why it’s just as important to wash your face in the morning as at night

news about happiness

A wellness expert says *this* is the next big thing

How to use lemongrass essential oil for cleaning

Watch your back, baking soda: This multitasking DIY cleaning ingredient is about to be *everywhere*

Are foodborne illness outbreaks on the rise?

Are foodborne illnesses on the rise, or what?

Horoscope of the day eclipse mercury retrograde

There’s *another* eclipse this week (oh, and btw Mercury’s going retrograde)—here’s how to cope

The super-simple way to biohack your body starts with sleep, according to an MD


Thumbnail for The super-simple way to biohack your body starts with sleep, according to an MD
Pin It
Photo: Creative Market/RawPixel
1/2
The word “biohacking” may conjure images of Silicon Valley coders in a computer lab and mad-scientist–esque experiment scenes, but in reality, it’s about the tiny ways you can improve your body inside and out. Or, as CEO of functional medicine practice Parsley Health Robin Berzin, MD, put it in a recent Facebook Live, “the principles and practices that help us feel better and help us optimize our health.”

You’re likely going to become extremely familiar with the buzzy term this year: It can help you optimize your morning cup of coffee and your orgasms alike. And while it might sound like a complicated workload to take on, the Well+Good Council member and functional medicine practitioner says all you need in order to start biohacking your body is an alarm clock.

Ever been up late enough that you feel like you’ve just received a second boost of energy? Dr. Berzin said that’s because for most people, staying up past 11 or 11:30 p.m. can result in a second spike of cortisol, the stress hormone that signals our bodies to get up and go.

“If your cortisol level is coming down, but then you stay up too late and it bumps again, that can create a disrupted sleep—a lighter sleep that’s not going into as many REM cycles.” —Dr. Robin Berzin

“Cortisol starts high in the morning and then it comes down over the course of the day,” Dr. Berzin said. “If it’s coming down, but then you stay up too late and it bumps again, that can create a disrupted sleep—a lighter sleep that’s not going into as many REM cycles.”

To avoid this, be mindful about going to bed earlier, maybe by 10 p.m., so you miss that second-wind hour, and end up enjoying a night of high-quality sleep. That’s right, biohackers: According to Dr. Berzin, not all eight-hour windows of shut-eye are created equally. Snoozing from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. can feel more refreshing than from 11 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Add this to the mounting list of reasons why you should really try to become a morning person.

Watch the full Facebook Live chat with Dr. Robin Berzin about biohacking below.
Get Started

2/2

Want to make habits out of the healthy things wellness superstars doScience says you should do it in the morning.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

An expert says how often should I wash my face

Why it’s just as important to wash your face in the morning as at night

how to be single and happy

5 science-backed tips for being single and happy—even if you *really* want a partner

signs that you're ready to turn your side-hustle into your full-time job

5 signs that you’re *finally* ready to make your side hustle your full-time gig

Is chocolate milk better than sports drinks?

Science says chocolate milk has major exercise recovery cred—but is it *actually* the best option?

Horoscope of the day eclipse mercury retrograde

There’s *another* eclipse this week (oh, and btw Mercury’s going retrograde)—here’s how to cope

The vegan poke bowl recipe secret ingredient

Make vegan poké taste like the real thing, thanks to one dietitian-approved simple trick