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Should you buy organic foods?

The skinny on a controversial new study.

By Leah Zerbe for

Is organic better? Many consumers swear by it, but a team of Stanford researchers made headlines recently with their finding that, after looking at data from 250 studies, there wasn’t a big difference in nutrient levels of organic and conventional food. The media jumped on it, flooding the news with headlines like, Organic Food Is Just A Crock and Organic Foods No Better For You.

But the research, published in the journal the Annals of Internal Medicine, is facing strong criticism from experts who say studies that fail to look at the big picture end up confusing people—rather than helping them make healthy choices.

“Nutrition studies miss the point,” says Charlotte Vallaeys, director of farm and food policy for The Cornucopia Institute, an organic watchdog group. “Consumers should not lose sight of the important impacts of organic agriculture, which produces foods without the use of toxic pesticides that have been linked to an array of health problems, including ADHD in children and cancer.”

Keep reading for reasons the study did support eating organic and for points it missed…

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