You May Also Like

Part of the 49 percent of women self-conscious about outfit repeating? Diane Von Furstenberg says you shouldn't be

Stop being self-conscious about repeating outfits—Diane Von Furstenberg says it’s a style *asset*

The scientific reason why you should always try to remember people's names

The scientific reason why you should always try to remember people’s names

horoscope healing

Do you want the good news or the bad news about this week’s horoscope?

Get in an intense workout *anywhere* using this completely collapsable Pilates reformer

Get in an intense workout *anywhere* using this completely collapsable Pilates reformer

How to shop for vitamins and supplements

Over 700 supplements were found to contain unlisted active ingredients—here’s how to buy one you can trust

Male vs Female bosses

I feel like I get along better with my male bosses—is it just me, or is it gender bias?

Why Gen Z-ers should unplug to recharge their mental-health batteries


Thumbnail for Why Gen Z-ers should unplug to recharge their mental-health batteries
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Liliya Rodnikova

Being a teenager was hard enough when the only social technology used on a daily basis was a clunky desktop computer in the classroom (for fighting cholera on The Oregon Trail, duh). Now teens never get a break: When they’re not texting their friends, they’re scrolling through Instagram, and the constant state of connection is messing with their mental health.

According to Thrive Global, when the Higher Education Research Institute first started surveying teens in 1985, only 18 percent said they “felt overwhelmed.” Today, the figure is 41 percent—a drastic change  from 29 percent in 2010. And the cause seems to point to social media—so much so that the The New York Times Magazine devoted its latest cover story to the topic.

In 1985, only 18 percent of teens said they “felt overwhelmed.” Today, the figure is 41 percent—a drastic change from 29 percent in 2010.

Though Instagram certainly didn’t invent anxiety, Benoit Denizet-Lewis, author of The New York Times story, found that many parents worried their kiddos’ all-hours-of-the-day digital diet was largely to blame for the struggles.

The problem doesn’t start and end with constant connectivity though: Social media emphasizes putting forth your perfect self, comparing, and, unfortunately, hurting others (unlike in the school hallways of yesteryear, bullies no longer even have to show their face to wreak havoc).

“With social media, the personal becomes the public in a way that a lot of kids don’t know how to handle,” Guy Diamond, PhD, told Thrive Global. “Even bullying used to be more of an isolated act. Even if it happened in the lunchroom, 10 people would see it. Now a thousand people see it.”

Ultimately, no matter your age, it’s important to unplug. Sure, Instagram and Snapchat can be helpful for ogling puppies and finding fresh workout ideas, but they can be rough on the quality of your mental health. So, consider taking a digital detox to recharge—all the latte art photos will still be there when you return.

We’re in a new era of mental-health authenticity—here’s why. Speaking of, honesty is now the trending topic on social media.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

peanut butter healthy snack

When a nutritionist and celeb trainer disagree: Can you have too much nut butter?

Gui pi wan: the energy tincture for afternoon slumps

The one tincture to keep in your bag for immediate natural bursts of energy

How to shop for vitamins and supplements

Over 700 supplements were found to contain unlisted active ingredients—here’s how to buy one you can trust

No excuses to vote for your healthy future: Uber will literally chauffeur you to your polling place

Uber is offering free rides to polling places across the US for next month’s midterm elections

Part of the 49 percent of women self-conscious about outfit repeating? Diane Von Furstenberg says you shouldn't be

Stop being self-conscious about repeating outfits—Diane Von Furstenberg says it’s a style *asset*

Venus in retrograde could be the reason Ariana and Pete split

Pete Davidson and Ariana Grande’s breakup was pretty much written in the stars