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3 pieces of ancient wisdom to help you deal with *all* the modern problems


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The modern world moves at a dizzying speed, with so many techy answers to age-old questions (How am I sleeping? Am I sick?). So, there’s totally room for equally savvy solutions to slow the pace—especially since technology may be bad for your mental health.

And sometimes, the sagest advice is the oldest advice: The words of ancient philosophers and intellectuals can actually help solve some very 2017 problems when applied accordingly.

So while you may not be able to control your toxic boss‘ behavior (because, you know, free will), consider applying some words of wisdom from these folks to help you respond better to certain situations. You may just be surprised by how well this ancient #realtalk resonates today.

Take in 3 seriously timeless pieces of advice below.

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1. “Beware of the barrenness of a busy life.”—Socrates

Although we’ve always had important stuff to do, the proliferation of instant gratification and access through smartphones and computers have made people busier. Or at least want to seem busier.

But the cult of busyness is full of pitfalls, which include everything terrible that happens when you’re stressed, as well as skipping out on much-deserved and needed TLC time. Socrates pretty much told us to Zen out in a really fancy way, TBH.

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2. “The greatest wealth is to live content with little.”—Plato

In addition to a technological boom, there’s also just been a lot more stuff to have. It’s a problem that a resurgence of minimalism has answered.

The trend, seen especially in style and decor, is the yin to the yang of today’s chaos and overwhelming number of choices Practice what Plato preached, and learn to do more with less—maybe start with a trimmed-down packing list for your next trip that would make Marie Kondo proud.

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3. “True happiness is…to enjoy the present without anxious dependence on the future.”—Seneca

Enjoying the present is, essentially, the practice of mindfulness. Try it right now even if you never have before (after all, the benefits of meditation aren’t just reserved for your yoga-obsessed bestie).

Sure, Seneca, a Roman philosopher and dramatist, didn’t have an Instagram feed to worry about curating like a wellness pro, but if he did, he’d probably still know when to unplug and be present. I mean, mindfulness improves your workouts, your mood, and even can help you deal with chronic illnesses.

But if you’re someone who has trouble sitting still for long periods of time—employ one of these meditation apps to help you start living more mindfully, even just for a minute a day.

Living in the now requires a whole tool kit. Read how wellness execs achieve work-life balance and one blogger’s tips for staying authentic on social media.