You May Also Like

New study says depression is linked to dementia

Depression may be an indicator of cognitive decline later in life, a study claims

Endometriosis sex tips

How to keep your sex life steamy (and pain-free) when you have endometriosis

Well+Good - 6 rules for living your best (and healthiest) life, according to Emma Watson

6 rules for living your best (and healthiest) life, according to Emma Watson

Health advice from food experts

The biggest piece of advice 3 influential foodies say is most important for health

Energy vampires and how to keep them away

How to deal if someone in your life is an “energy vampire”

Sulwhasoo inscape event

Tap these 2 grounding rituals for an instant relaxation boost

Vibram’s claims about preventing injury and increasing muscle were barely true


The slipper-like running shoe company is shelling out $37.5 million because of false health claims.
Vibram FiveFingers, barefoot running
(Photo: news.byu.edu)

If you’ve been running nearly barefoot in Vibram’s FiveFingers shoes, you might deserve a refund. (And a podiatry appointment.)

The company, known for those glove-like, barely-there shoes, recently settled a class action lawsuit because of false claims they made about their shoes’ ability to reduce running injuries and increase muscle.

Vibram will have to shell out $3.75 million to customers who purchased a pair of shoes going back as far as March 2009. (You’re potentially entitled to up to $94, if you’ve got a pair in your closet. Here’s further intel.)

This suit isn’t totally dissimilar from the trouble Skechers ($40 million) and Reebok ($25 million) got into with their ShapeUps, and EasyTone and RunTone shoes, respectively. Both companies made false claims about the booty-firming abilities of their footwear.

As far as injury prevention and the law goes, we think it’s probably best to leave the claims to helmets and suits of armor. —Molly Gallagher

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

Transgender brains mirror their desired gender

People’s brains mirror the gender they identify with—not their biological sex, a study finds

Health advice from food experts

The biggest piece of advice 3 influential foodies say is most important for health

Well+Good - The one supplement you should take every day, according to a neuroscientist

The one supplement you should take every day, according to a neuroscientist

Walmart has an affordable wellness section

Walmart is secretly the foolproof place to buy your self-care staples for under $15

New study says depression is linked to dementia

Depression may be an indicator of cognitive decline later in life, a study claims

How to massage your breasts for better health

Why you should be massaging your breasts on the reg