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This website lets you experience what it’s like to have dyslexia


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You can “understand” and “sympathize with” someone until you’re blue in the face, but until you’ve say, given birth or had a period, it’s hard to get, truly and exactly, the issues a given person navigates. Although you might appreciate that the common learning disability, dyslexia, makes reading and writing difficult, it’s not the same as experiencing life with the condition. A new website, however, is a new website that shows you what it’s like to try and read when you are dyslexic.

As one of the most common learning disabilities, dyslexia, by some estimates, affects 5 to 10 percent of the population.

As one of the most common learning disabilities, dyslexia, by some estimates, affects 5 to 10 percent of the population. And according to Mayo Clinic, it is essentially a disorder that makes reading and writing difficult due to problems identifying speech sounds and decoding.

As someone who does not have dyslexia, when I checked out the website, I was immediately overwhelmed by what appeared as the constant jumping of letters within words. The lines of text looked so muddled that it took me an exorbitant amount of time just to get through the first sentence. (FYI, that first sentence reads, “A friend who has dyslexia described to me how she experiences reading. She can read, but it takes a lot of concentration, and the letters seems to ‘jump around.'”)

Basically, the website can serve a reminder not to judge a person (or claim you truly understand them) until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes—or read a page with their peepers.

Ready to do some mindful read? Here’s what you need to know about Folk Rebellion’s new print newspaper and the most controversial stories on Well+Good this year

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