You May Also Like

Health advice from food experts

The biggest piece of advice 3 influential foodies say is most important for health

french girls secret to clear skin

The super simple way French women get radiant skin

New study says depression is linked to dementia

Depression may be an indicator of cognitive decline later in life, a study claims

The facial de-puffing tool Tracee Ellis Ross prefers over a jade roller

The puffy-face remedy that Tracee Ellis Ross prefers over a jade roller

Walmart has an affordable wellness section

Walmart is secretly the foolproof place to buy your self-care staples for under $15

Endometriosis sex tips

How to keep your sex life steamy (and pain-free) when you have endometriosis

What’s in your bug spray?


When it comes to keeping mosquitos away, you don't have to choose between harmful chemicals and getting eaten alive.

picnicVia HuffingtonPost.com

HuffingtonPost

It’s the height of summer—and if you’ve been spending more time outdoors lately, chances are you’ve got a few (or more) bug bites to show for your time in the sun.

And while bites from pests are an inevitable part of summer, it’s important to reduce your risk of bug bites from mosquitoes and ticks. That’s because several species of these insects can carry dangerous disease, including Lyme disease and West Nile virus.

“The most effective way to avoid West Nile virus disease is to prevent mosquito bites,” wrote the CDC in their summer health guidelines. “Repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection.”

Earlier this summer, the consumer advocacy organization Environmental Working Group compiled the latest research on bug sprays to help determine which repelling compounds were safest.

Keep reading to learn more about what’s in your bug spray…

More reading from HuffingtonPost.com

12 yoga poses to undo the damage of your desk job
An introvert’s guide to surviving (and thriving) in the workplace 

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

The facial de-puffing tool Tracee Ellis Ross prefers over a jade roller

The puffy-face remedy that Tracee Ellis Ross prefers over a jade roller

Transgender brains mirror their desired gender

People’s brains mirror the gender they identify with—not their biological sex, a study finds

How to massage your breasts for better health

Why you should be massaging your breasts on the reg

Shower Spas

This $3 buy will turn your shower into a full-on spa

Walmart has an affordable wellness section

Walmart is secretly the foolproof place to buy your self-care staples for under $15

Health advice from food experts

The biggest piece of advice 3 influential foodies say is most important for health