You May Also Like

What does organic mean in food? It depends

The key distinction between “made with organic” and “organic” food labels you *really* need to know

New best fitting bra changes size as you do

Get ready to buy a magic bra that can shift up to two sizes as you fluctuate

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

avocado honey face mask

Your beloved avocado is just as potent in this 2-ingredient face mask as it is delish

Target home decor now includes Society6 prints

Perk up your walls with healthy prints from Target’s new Society6 collab

Makeup stores near me: Go here while traveling

Didn’t pack your makeup bag? These are the best beauty stores around the world, according to Reddit

There’s a scientific reason why paper cuts hurt *so* freaking much


Thumbnail for There’s a scientific reason why paper cuts hurt *so* freaking much
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Andrey Pavlov

Broken bones? Ouch. Sprained ankle? Yikes. But, paper cuts? Good lord, the sheer agony. It doesn’t make sense why such an itty-bitty wound would cause such a massive and, TBH, completely unbearable amount of pain, but there’s a scientific reason behind it. So get ready to feel way less ridiculous for acting like a total baby when your bullet journal spontaneously transforms into a deli slicer.

According to The Conversation, the places where paper cuts typically occur—fingers, lips, tongue—are super-sensitive. Because of the nerve networks in those spots, you feel the feels a whole lot more, whether it’s pressure, heat, and—you guessed it—even the smallest of injuries. While these signal-receiving powers are so strong and keep you out of danger (by doing things like jolting you after touching a scalding-hot pan), there is a downside. Because when you do injure yourself, it hurts like a…well, you know.

“The depth of [a paper cut] wound is perfect for exposing and exciting the nerve fibers of the skin without damaging them the way a deeper, more destructive injury can. With a paper cut, the nerve fibers are lit, and they are fully operational.” —Gabriel Neal, MD

The initial pain isn’t the only reason paper cuts suck so much, though. According to family physician Gabriel Neal, MD, the fact that you use your fingers, lips, and tongue all day, every day also makes it really hard for the injuries to heal, causing you to go through the same pain whenever the gash reopens. Plus, a piece of paper slices just deeply enough to really drive you insane. “The depth of the wound is perfect for exposing and exciting the nerve fibers of the skin without damaging them the way a deeper, more destructive injury can, which severely damages the nerve fibers, impairing their ability to communicate pain. With a paper cut, the nerve fibers are lit, and they are fully operational,” Dr. Neal says.

If knowing this information is making you never want to use any sort of paper ever again, same. Here’s to saving the trees and saving your fingers.

Here’s exactly how to make ginger oil, the magical pain-relieving elixir. Or, try these six foods and drinks to help ease your headaches.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

Makeup stores near me: Go here while traveling

Didn’t pack your makeup bag? These are the best beauty stores around the world, according to Reddit

avocado honey face mask

Your beloved avocado is just as potent in this 2-ingredient face mask as it is delish

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

There’s a life-lengthening reason *not* to talk to your parents like they’re children

5 picks from the Sarah Jessica Parker book club

Can’t help but wonder what’s on Sarah Jessica Parker’s summer reading list? Check it out here

ClassPass Getaways offers mini wellness vacays

ClassPass’ latest offering lets you get some R & R on a mini wellness vacay

Well+Good - What #CareerGoals Means in 2018

What #CareerGoals Means in 2018