You May Also Like

What causes neck pain and stiffness? "Text neck"

We all suffer from “text neck”—here’s how to fix it and the migraines it causes

What every woman should understand about burnout

The one word you’re saying that could actually be causing anxiety

On-sale shower products you shouldn't have to live without

15 on-sale products from Target to turn your shower from blah to spa

What you should know about Menopause

5 things all women need to know about menopause—even if you think it’s decades away

horoscope cheat sheet

Everything you need to know about your astrological sign

Best healthy tech finds on Amazon Prime Day

Save *big* on 9 healthy-living tech must-haves this Amazon Prime Day

Why you shouldn’t feel guilty for taking a mental health day


Thumbnail for Why you shouldn’t feel guilty for taking a mental health day
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Firma

Most people know that feeling of drafting an email to your boss to call in “sick”—when they actually aren’t. Writing the lies about bad sushi or up-all-night puking brings waves of guilt. Why is it so hard to spell out the truth: “Hi boss. I’m feeling extremely stressed/exhausted/overwhelmed and need to take a mental health day today.”

According to Forbes, it actually benefits companies when their employees take time to tend to depression, anxiety, or other issues every now and then. And a new report released by the National Business Group on Health shows that mental illness is becoming a rising problem in the workplace and results in more missed days and poorer work performance. According to the report, mental illness and substance abuse costs companies $17 billion each year and 217 million missed days. The takeaway: It’s a lot more beneficial for employers if their staffers take a few days off a year to recharge rather than confronting a more serious health issue down the road.

 “If it is important for employees to regularly contribute high-impact, high-quality work, it is equally essential they have flexible, paid time to contribute to their whole health and wellness.”

Mental health days are just as important as sick days, vacation, or any other form of paid time off,” The Courage Practice founder Tonyalynne Wildhaber tells Forbes. “If it is important for employees to regularly contribute high-impact, high-quality work, it is equally essential they have flexible, paid time to contribute to their whole health and wellness.”

Psychologist David Butlein, PhD, points out that if you have a career that requires creativity, it is extra important to take a “me” day every now and then. “It’s well documented that stress inhibits the creative process—humans in fight or flight [mode] aren’t thinking about new ways of doing things, they’re just trying to reduce the pain of stress and overwhelm,” he says. “Mental health is essential for the creative class to stay creative.”

Putting aside time to be inspired could be just what you need to dream up your next big idea.

Here are some sure signs depression and anxiety are affecting your health. And if you’re wondering what exactly you should do on your mental health day, you can use this guide as your blueprint.  

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

What you should know about Menopause

5 things all women need to know about menopause—even if you think it’s decades away

Oranges help macular degeneration prevention

Logging some serious screen time? Eat *this* fruit to keep your vision game strong

Best career for your Myers-Briggs

The best career path for you, according to your Myers-Briggs personality type

miranda kerr stress anxiety

Miranda Kerr’s secrets for dealing with stress and anxiety

Best healthy tech finds on Amazon Prime Day

Save *big* on 9 healthy-living tech must-haves this Amazon Prime Day

horoscope cheat sheet

Everything you need to know about your astrological sign