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The reason why more people are cutting ties with soda—for good


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Photo: Stocksy/Alejandro Moreno De Carlos

When faced with trying to decide between going for a bottle of soda or Kevita kombucha (which is now owned by PepsiCo, by the way), it turns out more goes into the decision than what’s touted on the label. Data has shown that price can make or break consumers’ buying habits when it comes to buying a sugary drink, or going for something healthier.

For this reason, more citizens are starting to lobby for local soda taxes, following in the footsteps of cities like San Francisco and Boulder, CO—but do they actually result in better public health, or just higher prices? In other words, are they actually effective?

According to new reports, the answer is a resounding yes. Mexico’s soda sales have drastically fallen since putting a levy in place in 2014. According to a new study published in Health Affairs, the first year it was implemented led to a 5.5 percent drop in sales, and last year, the drop increased to 9.5 percent.

And it’s not just Mexico. Philadelphia recently put a soda tax in place and according to BillyPenn, sales fell 40 percent the first month—that means the city decreased its soda consumption by almost half. When it comes to the war on sugar, this is a huge win. (As you probably know by now, the sweet stuff kills.)

And it looks like food and beverage manufacturers are recognizing the demand for more healthy products—just this week, news came out that nearly half of PepsiCo’s revenue comes from “healthier foods.” Okay, so they’re considering Baked Lays and cereal bars as healthy, but it still says something about a huge shift in the market. And the more megabrands recognize the demand, the more nutritious choices you’ll have—at affordable prices—when you’re cruising the supermarket aisles, or taking a break at work.

Vending machine kombucha? Hey, it could happen.

Speaking of kombucha, here’s how to read the label so you know you’re choosing the healthiest one possible. But that’s not the only way to get your probiotics in, of course. 

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