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The latest research on food allergies might expand your (meal) horizons


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Photo: Stocksy/Crissy Mitchell

Whether it’s nuts, dairy, gluten, eggs, or something else entirely, it seems almost everyone has a food allergy. For some people, living with it may be NBD, but others may find it torturous. (Imagine a life without avocados.) Whatever’s on your absolutely-can’t-eat list, soon, you might be able to rethink your meals. According to a new study published in the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, it’s possible to outgrow your bad reactions. In fact, in their participant pool, 86 percent did. Pretty major!

So, how do you know if a food that previously made you break out in hives or messed with your digestive system is okay to eat? It turns out, there’s a test for that, which measures a person’s IgE levels. (That’s science speak for a specific type of antibody.) The higher the level, the more allergic you are.

The way researchers ran the test with their participants was giving them a teeny tiny bit of the allergy-inducing food, and if there were no symptoms, having the participant eat a little bit more, and then a little bit more. And the vast majority of them were able to start eating their no-no foods again.

So no matter what you’re allergic to, it’s encouraging that it might not be that way for life. Hello, post-workout peanut butter snack!

Even if you aren’t full-on allergic, dairy still leaves many people feeling not-so great. Here’s how to live life without it. And while you’re still waiting to outgrow your allergies, here’s a delish recipe that should be pretty safe.