You May Also Like

Woman with hat

If a tinted moisturizer and a matte foundation had a baby, it would be this

do we need carbs

Low-carb diets are trending—do we even need the macronutrient at all?

How to improve confidence

Boost your confidence in 4 steps—even when you think your reflection looks like the Corpse Bride

Acids for skin care

Move over, collagen—there’s a buzzy new skin-care supplement in town

This is the least common Myers-Briggs personality type

This is the least common Myers-Briggs personality type

Ever heard of desk yoga? It can help your back

4 chair yoga moves that treat back pain sustained from slouching at your desk job

This Japanese chef uses fruits and veggies to create hypnotizing works of art


Thumbnail for This Japanese chef uses fruits and veggies to create hypnotizing works of art
Pin It
Photo: Instagram/@gakugakugakugakugaku1
1/8

Instagram is largely responsible for ushering in a new era of food as art, making the practice of taking a photo of your brunch in good lighting an acceptable practice (among millennials, at least). But apparently, Instagram has also provided a platform for traditional food art as well. Adding to the digital still lifes of smoothies and oatmeal bowls, a chef in Japan has turned his Instagram into a display of his vegetal sculptural creations made via the centuries-old Thai art of fruit carving.

According to Atlas Obscura, Takehiro Kishimoto, a chef based in Kobe, Japan, started carving produce like radishes, mango, citrus fruits, carrots, and much more three years ago before finally sharing them on Instagram in 2016. The time Kishimoto needs to complete a piece ranges from an hour to carve broccoli to three hours to carve an apple; everyone’s favorite, avocado, takes about two hours. His method, the traditional one for fruit carving, was originally used to decorate the tables of the royal Thai family in the 14th century and eventually made its way to Japan. And today, the practice is experiencing a revival, thanks to social media.

After Kishimoto is finished carving and photographing his creation, he simply eats it. And, who can blame him? Especially since studies have shown that taking a photo of your food actually makes it taste better.

See 7 of Kishimoto’s stunning food-art designs below.

Get Started
2/8

3/8

4/8

5/8

6/8

7/8

8/8

See how art and food continue to coalesce with the trends of millennial pink lettuce and blue majik.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

lattes

And the 2018 winner for best coffee city in America is…

This is the least common Myers-Briggs personality type

This is the least common Myers-Briggs personality type

ketogenic diet for anxiety

I tried the ketogenic diet to help with my anxiety—here’s what happened

How to improve confidence

Boost your confidence in 4 steps—even when you think your reflection looks like the Corpse Bride

do we need carbs

Low-carb diets are trending—do we even need the macronutrient at all?

Relationship wisdom from love guru Esther Perel

3 pieces of modern relationship wisdom from rock star psychotherapist Esther Perel