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This Japanese chef uses fruits and veggies to create hypnotizing works of art


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Photo: Instagram/@gakugakugakugakugaku1
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Instagram is largely responsible for ushering in a new era of food as art, making the practice of taking a photo of your brunch in good lighting an acceptable practice (among millennials, at least). But apparently, Instagram has also provided a platform for traditional food art as well. Adding to the digital still lifes of smoothies and oatmeal bowls, a chef in Japan has turned his Instagram into a display of his vegetal sculptural creations made via the centuries-old Thai art of fruit carving.

According to Atlas Obscura, Takehiro Kishimoto, a chef based in Kobe, Japan, started carving produce like radishes, mango, citrus fruits, carrots, and much more three years ago before finally sharing them on Instagram in 2016. The time Kishimoto needs to complete a piece ranges from an hour to carve broccoli to three hours to carve an apple; everyone’s favorite, avocado, takes about two hours. His method, the traditional one for fruit carving, was originally used to decorate the tables of the royal Thai family in the 14th century and eventually made its way to Japan. And today, the practice is experiencing a revival, thanks to social media.

After Kishimoto is finished carving and photographing his creation, he simply eats it. And, who can blame him? Especially since studies have shown that taking a photo of your food actually makes it taste better.

See 7 of Kishimoto’s stunning food-art designs below.

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See how art and food continue to coalesce with the trends of millennial pink lettuce and blue majik.

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