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Give your coffee a fall twist—without adding sugar


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Photo: Stocksy/Carina Konig

This year, Starbucks released their beloved pumpkin spice latte on August 28—way before it was cold enough to dig out the oversized scarf from the closet (looking at you, Lenny Kravitz). Year after year, PSL love remains strong—especially in Tennessee, apparently. Yet, as you’ve probably guessed, the sweet drink isn’t exactly good for you…and it’s not even made with real pumpkin, for that matter.

Sure, there are ways to make a healthier version of the drink, however, there’s another way to give your coffee a fall twist, too: just add cinnamon. The spice gives any cup a sort of de-facto sweetness, reminiscent of so many of the autumn pies and baked goods it’s used in (and chances are that you already have it at home in your spice drawer). Of course, if you prefer to stop by Starbucks on your way to work, you’ll likely save a few bucks by ordering a regular coffee and heading over to the land of cinnamon shakers.

Besides conjuring up the spirit of fall with one simple ingredient, it also benefits your body in a myriad of ways. Keep reading to see how.

Scroll down to see why cinnamon in coffee is an easy, delicious health win.

cinnamon in coffee
Photo: Getty Images/ Nattanart Prasomsri

The benefits of cinnamon in coffee

1. It will help you focus better at work. Coffee is already a savior on those I’m-too-tired-to-function days. But according to a studies, cinnamon helps the brain process information better by boosting its ability to use glucose. How well the brain functions is directly linked to glucose levels. So you can see why cinnamon and coffee make a pretty dynamic duo.

2. It helps kill bad bacteria. Cinnamon is anti-microbial, meaning it kills bad bacteria and stops them from growing or multiplying. In these times when there seems to be a food poisoning outbreak every other week, it certainly doesn’t hurt to have a little extra protection in your diet.

3. It’s a good source of antioxidants. Cinnamon is loaded with polyphenols, a powerful antioxidant that’s good for your heart, brain, and digestion. That’s a major multi-tasking win.

4. It may help protect against heart disease. At least in rats, cinnamon has shown to be good for the heart, thanks to its anti-inflammatory powers.

The takeaway here: Cinnamon is just as big on benefits as it is on taste. This just may be a coffee hack you’ll be using long after fall ends.

Speaking of coffee, here’s everything you need to know about how it affects the body. And here’s how much is safe to drink every day.

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