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This easy sweet potato side dish is Thanksgiving recipe gold


Welcome back to Well Done, Well+Good’s seriously tasty food (and drink!) video series, featuring easy-healthy-gorgeous recipes from the wellness scene’s buzziest chefs, nutritionists, and Instagram foodies.

If there ever was a day in dire need of a fast-forward button, it’d be Thanksgiving. In a perfect world, you could just skip the hours of roasting and chopping and go straight to the meal (and oh-so-glorious post-food nap).

To help you get to the good stuff faster, genius food blogger (and recipe whiz) Rachel Mansfield is serving up a quickie side-dish that will check off your pot-luck contribution and your seasonal cravings: coconut-crusted sweet potato fries.

Not only can you whip them up in five steps, but you can also skip the pre-holiday grocery store crowds. Mansfield scored all of the ingredients with FoodKick powered by Fresh Direct, the on-demand grocery service that delivers your picks (including chilled wine* and liquor) straight to your door in as little as an hour. Hello, sanity saver.

Watch how to make these easy sweet potato fries in the video above, and scroll down for the full recipe.

 

Coconut-Crusted Sweet Potato Fries

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 large sweet potatoes, cut length-wise
2 tsp coconut oil
1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
2 Tbsp coconut flour
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp nutmeg

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees and line a baking tray with parchment paper.

2. In a food processor, pulse the coconut flakes until they become more fine. (You can skip this step if the flakes are already this consistency.)

3. Add the flakes, coconut flour, cinnamon, and nutmeg to a medium bowl.

4. Coat the sweet potato slices with coconut oil (you may need more depending on size) and roll each into the coconut flake mixture.

5. Add the coated slices to the baking tray and bake for 20–30 minutes. Flip, and then bake another 10 minutes or until cooked to your liking. Enjoy!

Bonus: Get $25 off your first FoodKick order of $50 or more** with code WELL25! (Heads up, offer ends 1/31/18.)

In partnership with FoodKick

*Wines & Spirits are sold by FreshDirect Wines & Spirits, an independently owned store with NY State License #1277181 | 620 5th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11215.

**This offer is for $25 off your first FoodKick order totaling $50 or more before taxes and delivery fees. Offer is valid for one time use only for first-time residential customers in the FoodKick delivery areas. Expires at 11:59PM on January 31, 2018. All standard customer terms and conditions apply. FoodKick reserves the right to cancel or modify the offer at any time. Void where prohibited. Offer is nontransferable. ©2017 Fresh Direct, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 

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