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There’s a new healthy food delivery service in town—and it’s doctor-approved


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Photo: Facebook/@BeWellByDrFrankLipman

If you could choose any dynamic duo to help you make healthy food choices every day, who better than functional medicine expert Frank Lipman, MD, and healthy celebrity chef Tricia Williams? Well, good news: The two teamed up to launch Be Well Eats, and it’s definitely not your typical food-delivery service.

Throughout her time running her own personalized food service, Food Matters NYC, Williams’ holistic approach to well-being overlapped with Dr. Lipman’s, and they often collaborated on meal plans for his patients. Now, they’re combining their expertise on something they say is more of a lifestyle plan that a diet. “A lot of my clients have either gone vegan or ketogenic, and if they just put those two diets together, it’s what Frank and I think is really the perfect diet. You have low carbohydrates, a significant amount of plant-based food, and healthy fats—and that’s what Be Well Eats is,” she tells me.

The service—which is currently available in New York City (with plans to spread regionally, then to the West coast)—delivers the ready-to-eat, nutrient-packed meals and smoothies right to your door. Right now, there are three available plans—three-day, five-day, and seven-day—starting at $75. All options are organic, locally sourced when possible, and free of grains, dairy, and refined sugar—plus they often have the added benefits of adaptogenic herbs and probiotic-rich fermented foods.

 

“Our biggest message is teaching people to reach for their kitchen cabinet before their medicine cabinet and we’ve created a really easy system for everything you could possibly need or want for your body.” —Tricia Williams

“We love using adaptogenic herbs like schisandra, cordyceps, sometimes ashwagandha—it really helps the body process stress by nourishing the adrenals,” Williams says. “What’s nice about using adaptogens is that they’re foods found in nature. Schisandra is a berry and codyceps is a mushroom, so it integrates really well in menu planning. We also do a lot with anti-inflammatory foods, like turmeric, moringa, and tart cherry extract.”

Ultimately the duo has one goal in mind: using the power of these superfoods to heal and nourish people’s bodies in a way they might not have even known was possible. This intention aligns with other research and docs who note the connection between food and mental health. “Our biggest message is teaching people to reach for their kitchen cabinet before their medicine cabinet, and we’ve created a really easy system for everything you could possibly need or want for your body,” Williams says. “10 years ago when I started Food Matters, you had to go to a health food market to find chia seeds. Now you can go to a ShopRite and there’s chia seeds and coconut oil; all these things that weren’t really accessible.”

Williams says she thinks the world is ready for the shift—and their food service could be just the fuel that kicks that improved lifestyle into high gear.

Hyatt will soon have Dr. Frank Lipman-approved wellness services. Or, try Tricia Williams’ stress-reducing dessert.

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