You May Also Like

Is having a vegan pregnancy diet healthy? We asked a nutritionist

Is it healthy to stick to a vegan diet when you’re pregnant?

healthiest fast food burger

If you’re going to get a fast-food burger, choose one of these antibiotic-free options

How to fight a cold on a plane? Meghan Markle stole Leo DiCaprio's tip

The cold-busting travel hack Meghan Markle stole from Leonardo DiCaprio

5 folic acid benefits that will convince you to become more familiar with the nutrient

4 health perks of folate and folic acid every woman can benefit from—pregnant or not

coffee antioxidants

Ever wonder what all those antioxidants in your coffee actually do?

Get yuzu fruit in Trader Joe's new sparkling coconut water

Get an energizing splash of an Asian superfruit in Trader Joe’s new sparkling coconut water

Here’s what you should and shouldn’t do when washing your produce


Thumbnail for Here’s what you should and shouldn’t do when washing your produce
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Suzanne Clements

As salad devotees across the country are well aware, an E. coli outbreak spawned by chopped romaine lettuce is now ravaging the country. Experts say the contamination first occurred on the farm and was exacerbated by cross contamination during the production process that prewashed bags go through. In light of this news, it’s super-important to know best practices for washing your fruits and vegetables.

Only wash produce right before you eat it, since once wet, the surfaces become a moist and damp environment in which bacteria and germs thrive.

There are a few things you should decidedly not do to rid your greens of harmful germs or bacteria, according to Time. One is to avoid commercial produce cleaners: A study found that specially designed produce-washing solutions are less useful than water is for removing germs, and the FDA specifically recommends washing produce with water rather than with commercial products.

Furthermore, avoid using a brush to scrub your vegetables, since the practice will likely introduce bacteria to your food. Along those bacteria-spreading lines, make sure that your hands and kitchen surfaces are clean before you rinse your produce.

Here’s what you should do to clean your produce like a pro: Wash the items only right before eating, since once wet, the surface of the fruit or vegetable becomes a moist and damp environment in which bacteria and germs thrive. To wash a fruit or vegetable with hard skin (i.e., one that you wouldn’t puree), rub it with your (clean!) hands while holding it under running water, and then dry it thoroughly with a (clean!) towel.

Though diligently washing your fresh foods make them safer to eat, you might want to avoid buying romaine lettuce potentially contaminated with E. coli altogether and instead substitute it with carefully washed kale for your healthy Caesar salad.

Some say it’s helpful to wash your produce with baking soda, which, when consumed with water, might actually fight inflammation.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

halloween avocado toast

Here’s how to give your avocado toast a Halloween makeover

healthiest fast food burger

If you’re going to get a fast-food burger, choose one of these antibiotic-free options

recurrent UTI

Burning question: Why does my UTI keep coming back?

Keto PSA: You've probably been using a cheese grater wrong your entire life

I’ve been using a cheese grater the wrong way my entire life

coffee antioxidants

Ever wonder what all those antioxidants in your coffee actually do?

Is having a vegan pregnancy diet healthy? We asked a nutritionist

Is it healthy to stick to a vegan diet when you’re pregnant?