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The genius tip to make your pricey, probiotic-packed Coconut Cult yogurt last way longer


Thumbnail for The genius tip to make your pricey, probiotic-packed Coconut Cult yogurt last way longer
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Photo: Instagram/@leefromamerica

Spending $25 on 16 ounces of vegan yogurt might sound absolutely insane, but the Coconut Cult’s product might just be worth it. The amount of probiotics it packs per serving is so large, it’s basically a supplement in snack form. Which is why—combined with the price tag—you should try and make your jar last as long as possible.

Lee Tilghman—the health blogger behind Lee from America—knows the struggle of stretching the lifespan of the high-end, creamy, no-sugar-added treat, and she recently shared a genius tip on Instagram for achieving just that, courtesy of writer James Kicinski-McCoy. And all you need is a few key players: coconut milk, some extra probiotics, a cheesecloth, and a wooden spoon

“When you’re almost finished with your jar of Coconut Cult—I left about two to three tablespoons—add a can of organic, full-fat coconut milk to the jar. Make sure your coconut milk isn’t separated but well combined, to avoid coconut milk chunks in your finished product. Empty two probiotic pills into the jar. Using a wooden spoon, stir well to combine.” —Lee Tilghman, Lee from America blogger

“When you’re almost finished with your jar of Coconut Cult—I left about two to three tablespoons—add a can of organic, full-fat coconut milk to the jar. Make sure your coconut milk isn’t separated but well combined, to avoid coconut milk chunks in your finished product,”Tilghman wrote. “Empty two probiotic pills into the jar. Using a wooden spoon, stir well to combine—metal spoons can harm the probiotics. Get all the yogurt off the sides and mix it in with your coconut milk.”

After stirring, simply cover the jar with cheesecloth or a T-shirt and set it in a warm, sunny spot next to all of your plant babies for two days. No sun? No problem: Tilghman said you can also leave it in the oven with the oven light on for the same amount of time. Once those 48 hours are up, stick it back in the fridge and enjoy.

Obviously, this hack is pure gold when it comes to making your expensive jar of yogurt last way longer, but how long can you pull these shenanigans effectively? According to Tilghman, you can use the trick two to three times per jar to keep getting the same flavor you know and love. Then grab a brand-new jar and repeat, because it seems unlikely that this gut-health obsession dies down anytime soon.

This nut-milk yogurt is probably colonizing a dairy case near you. Also, check out the new plant-based soft-serve yogurt brand that tops your bowl with CBD.

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