You May Also Like

5 folic acid benefits that will convince you to become more familiar with the nutrient

4 health perks of folate and folic acid every woman can benefit from—pregnant or not

No excuses to vote for your healthy future: Uber will literally chauffeur you to your polling place

Uber is helping make it super-easy (and free!) to get to your polling place to vote on November 6

Is that red spot a lip pimple or a cold sore?

Let’s play a little game I like to call ‘lip pimple or herpes?’

Does splashing water in your face really help with anxiety, or is it just a thing people do in movies?

Does splashing water on your face really help with anxiety, or is it just something people do in movies?

New hair removal products from Flamingo are for women

Meet Flamingo, the choose your own adventure of hair-removal lines

Get yuzu fruit in Trader Joe's new sparkling coconut water

Get an energizing splash of an Asian superfruit in Trader Joe’s new sparkling coconut water

Could insect protein be the new trendy hot food ticket?


Thumbnail for Could insect protein be the new trendy hot food ticket?
Pin It
Photo: Creative Market/Foxys

People have been trying to make the whole eating-insects-as-food trend happen for a while—bugs were even just served at Justin Timberlake’s album-listening party. Now, years after brands first attempted to make bugs-as-protein a mainstream delicacy (that’s also rich in iron an calcium), is it finally happening? According to one survey, the simple answer is no. At least not yet.

A poll of 2,036 British consumers, conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of The Grocer, found only 14 percent of people would ever think about eating insects as a snack. On top of that, just a fifth would eat insects if they were ground up into food. Clearly these Brits weren’t even into the idea without teeny legs and antennae sticking out of their meals.

Even though it’s been reported that two billion people (yes, billion!) regularly eat insects around the globe in order to get their protein fix, it’s not even close to being the norm worldwide.

Even though it’s been reported that two billion people (yes, billion!) regularly eat insects around the globe in order to get their protein fix, the practice is not even close to being the norm worldwide. Ants and beetle larvae are nutrition go-tos in Australia and Africa, and crispy-fried locusts are popular in Thailand. But despite beautifully packaged products like cricket energy bars and crackers to buffalo worms (yes, really), it’s not something the worldwide masses have been able to get down with.

Because people are becoming increasingly concerned with the environmental impact of eating meat, insects might be adopted as a more sustainable source of protein in the future. For now, though, plant-based options like tofu, nuts, tempeh, and chickpeas might be your best bet for pleasing a crowd of socially conscious and super-trendy eaters—or, you know, just stick to anything that doesn’t crawl or bite.

This is the protein-packed breakfast Pippa Middleton swears by. Or, try Ashley Graham’s favorite post-workout snack to get your fix.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

Does splashing water in your face really help with anxiety, or is it just a thing people do in movies?

Does splashing water on your face really help with anxiety, or is it just something people do in movies?

coffee antioxidants

Ever wonder what all those antioxidants in your coffee actually do?

Ellie Kemper waxing poetic about the joy of having the best SoulCycle bike in class is the best thing you'll read today

Ellie Kemper waxing poetic about finding the best SoulCycle bike is the best thing you’ll read today

Get yuzu fruit in Trader Joe's new sparkling coconut water

Get an energizing splash of an Asian superfruit in Trader Joe’s new sparkling coconut water

Get in an intense workout *anywhere* using this completely collapsable Pilates reformer

Get in an intense workout *anywhere* using this completely collapsable Pilates reformer

New hair removal products from Flamingo are for women

Meet Flamingo, the choose your own adventure of hair-removal lines