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Is avocado about to be toast? Late-night dinner might be the new brunch


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Photo: Stocksy/Lumina

If brunch is your favorite meal of the day, you’re in good company (like, probably literally). But despite the breakfast-lunch combo being just as delicious as it is trendy, brunch might be losing its status as the meal around which you plan your Instagrams. That’s right, according to a new survey, late-night dinner is the on-the-rise sit-down setting.

Uber Eats—the transport company’s meal-delivery app—polled more than 1,000 adults for its first-ever How America Eats survey and found eating habits might be changing. While going to brunch used to be an every-weekend occurrence, the data showed it might be dying. (Is it possible avocado is about to be toast due to the expected price surge of the creamy green fruit?) Instead, based on the findings, eating a weekly late-night meal is now nearly twice as common as brunch. Gasp.

While going to brunch used to be an every-weekend occurrence, the data showed it might be dying. Instead, eating a late-night meal is now nearly twice as common as brunch.

And with everyone’s overly-busy schedules, it only makes sense that dinnertime has been pushed back a bit, at least once or twice a week. Sure, it would be nice to sit down for a healthy dinner at 6:30 p.m., on the dot, every night, but it simply won’t always happen—and that’s okay.

But, rest assured: Even though you might eat dinner past your bedtime occasionally, it’s not the worst thing people do. The survey also found 56 percent of US adults have eaten food they know is expired, and 50 percent have eaten food that’s fallen on the floor. And munching on spoiled food that failed the five-second rule is worse than sacrificing your brunch in favor of a weekend SoulCycle or Pilates sesh every. single. time.

Don’t give up brunch just yet—you still have to try these pitless avocados. Also, check out why Chrissy Teigen is so over boozy brunches.

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