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The FDA tells Americans (for the first time) to limit their daily sugar intake


sugar, FDAWe predicted sugar would be the dietary evil of 2015, and it looks like we were right.

This week, the Food and Drug Administration recommended a daily cap on the amount of sugar Americans eat (and drink) for the first time.

According to the New York Times, the FDA says we should limit added sugar to no more than 10 percent of daily caloric intake, which is about 12.5 teaspoons (or 50 grams) for an average adult.

The recommendation is not as stringent as what many nutritionists and organizations like the World Health Organization and American Heart Association advise, but it’s much lower than what Americans are currently consuming, on average (that would be 13.5 percent of daily calories).

Plus, the limit is just the first step in the FDA’s plan to help people cut back; they’re also trying to change labels to differentiate between the amount of added sugar and naturally occurring sugar (like in fruit) in foods.

Industry groups, however, are fighting that change, and some nutritionists and RDs say the body treats all sugar equally. No matter what happens, the fact that the FDA is paying attention to the fact that everything from salad dressing to whole wheat bread is filled with way too much sugar is pretty sweet. —Lisa Elaine Held

For the full story, visit nytimes.com, and check out these six tips for cutting back on sugar.