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Why one dermatologist thinks the future of skincare is about to get techy


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To this point, skin care has been primarily driven by a product’s ingredients. Think about it: There’s zit-busting (and Instagrammable) blue tansy, brightening vitamin C, and do-it-all coconut oil; not to mention, new delivery systems and ways to get said ingredients into skin galore. And that’s exactly why one dermatologist believes that gadgets are the wave of the skin-care future.

The future of cosmetic dermatology, anti-aging, and wellness is about the advances in technology.

“The future of cosmetic dermatology, anti-aging, and wellness is about the advances in technology, as it’s really about how we’re going to get these ingredients into the skin,” says Dr. Paul Jarrod Frank, MD a New York City-based dermatologist, who founded the namesake PFRANKMD Skin Salon. “I see this in my practice now—we’re using lasers to deliver products now.”

For example, Dr. Frank offers Fraxel laser treatment in his office, but uses the Clear + Brilliant on his younger patients. “The Clear + Brilliant is just a mini Fraxel,” he says, “but its target and its strength is much less aggressive. The technology companies are making less invasive devices for consumers with different needs.”

But you don’t have to make an appointment at the dermatologist’s office to take advantage of technology. The trickle-down is now working its way into at-home skincare, with a slew of different lasers, LED lights (blue LED works wonders for acne; amber LED has been said to stimulate collagen production), massagers, and tools to help increase ingredient absorption and aid with the texture of skin.

Dr. Frank, for example, suggests using the MDNA Skin Rejuvenator Set, which comes packaged with a dual-ended tool. One side is magnetic to remove volcanic-ash clay mask (which is also included) from skin, while the other side is “a micro-current device that helps open the pores to infuse the serum that’s left behind,” he says.

So, keep your appointment if you have it, but if you’re looking for a night in, try one of these cool new innovations, meant to smooth, tighten, and lift skin while increasing ingredient absorption, minimizing acne, and nixing flaky patches, too.

Scroll down to browse 5 skin-care devices worth giving a try.

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There are a tons of other ways to get a radiant complexion, such as Tammy Fender’s facial massage technique or one of these exfoliating face masks perfect for dry, winter skin.

 

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