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Real talk: Will hair-growth supplements make hair grow all over your body?


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Photo: Stocksy/Guille Faingold
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Say you got a fresh summer chop—maybe you even took a page from Zoe Kravitz and Cara Delevingne’s bold handbook and buzzed it all off—but now you’re itching for thick, flowing Kardashian-esque locks. Or you’re in that awkward growing-your-hair-out phase and just wish you could take a magic pill to get your tresses down past your shoulder blades, ASAP. You’d reach for a hair-growth supplement, right?

After all, women have had major success upping shine, volume, and length, thanks to nutrients like biotin, zinc, and B vitamins. “Hair-growth supplements are vitamin-based and have essential fatty acids, which help with hydration of the hair,” says Corina Crysler, clinical nutritionist and co-founder of Glisodin Skin Nutrients.

But if supplements make the strands on your head grow, will they do the same for all the hair on your body? Will your Khaleesi locks come with a side of Chewbacca?

Here’s what you need to know about the impact hair-growth vitamins have on your entire body.

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hair growth supplements
Photo: Stocksy/Milles Studio

Drum roll please….Yes, they could. “Just like a skin supplement wouldn’t just target your face, hair-growth supplements are going to affect all hair follicles, whether on your head, face, or legs,” Crysler says. Gulp.

When you take a vitamin, your body absorbs the nutrients so they can get to work on your hair, skin, gut, or whatever it is you’re hoping to boost. “The mechanism of action is targeted, but that doesn’t mean it’s targeted to one specific part of the body—unless you’re taking something for your heart, that is,” adds Crysler. In other words, your body’s not going to know that your goal is to get waist-length hair and not some upper-lip fuzz—hair is hair.

“Hair growth supplements are going to affect all hair follicles.”

The bright side is, if you don’t already have facial hair, these supplements won’t cause you to sprout some. “Facial hair that’s not existing would only come about if the hormones in your body go out of whack and testosterone is increased,” says Crysler. “But most products that are meant for hair growth don’t include hormones.”

And it goes without saying that body hair is completely natural and isn’t something anyone should be ashamed of. But if you’re the type who has her waxer’s number on speed dial, mentally prepare yourself for the extra fuzz that could be in your future (and hey, maybe brush up on face shaving, just in case).

You could also try this coconut oil hack to make your hair grow faster—or just eat these 5 foods for super-shiny, healthy tresses.