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A brand-new muddy challenge that’s made for women


Mudderella
Mud races are all the rage. But the newest brand on the scene is bucking the image of burly dudes jumping over fire. Mudderella, which kicks off with its first event this September, is made for women.

It’s a model that makes a lot of sense. For starters, more women are doing super-athletic workouts and strength training, like at CrossFit and Barry’s Bootcamp, as part of regular of their fitness routine. And New Yorkers are so into these grimy outdoor challenges in general that fitness studios, like As One, now offer targeted training programs for clients to prep for them.

While other slogging-through-mud companies for women do exist (the Dirty Girl 5K is a big one), the team behind Mudderella says that theirs is more challenging, and more empowering.

“We wanted to create an event, experience, and brand that really celebrates strong, confident, athletic women,” says CEO Cristina DeVito, who’s spearheading a slew of events across the US, in the UK, and Australia, in 2013 and 2014.

What will they look like? Mudderella’s course is about five-to-seven miles and includes a dozen or more obstacles. And some of them are much more creative than your average wall climbing. The Hat Trick, for example, has you trampoline onto a cargo net, climb up it, and then slide down into a muddy pool. I also like the sound of “Break the Glass Ceiling.” None of them look easy, and the course looks destined to ruin your favorite sneakers. (Check out the video for a peek.)

Mudderella events are challenging, but not timed. So while you’ll be overcoming obstacles, you won’t be competing. Other differences are a Stretch + Strengthen section at the start of the event and a Rinse + Revive portion after the finish line, where you can shower and celebrate.

Oh, and men aren’t totally banned. Guys can participate, but they have to be invited to join a team by a registered female. (This seems to water down the concept a bit, but it could be useful…)

Finally, Mudderella is sounding the gong of female empowerment in one more way—they’re partnering with Futures Without Violence, a charity that works to prevent and end domestic violence.

Says DeVito,”We really want to promote inner and outer strength and overcoming obstacles and challenges—in all aspects of women’s lives.” —Lisa Elaine Held

For more information, visit www.mudderella.com