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Barry’s Bootcamp expands across the country, and beyond


Barry's BootcampThis fall, Barry’s Bootcamp, the supremely sweaty workout beloved by boutique fitness aficionados (and celebs like like Kim Kardashian and Amanda Seyfried) is opening new studios in two major U.S. cities it has yet to conquer—Boston and Miami. And those openings are just one piece of a major muscle-powered expansion around the world.

The Los Angeles-based company, whose butt-kicking method mixes treadmill sprints and heavy-lifting intervals in an hour-long class, planted its flag on the East Coast with the opening of its Chelsea location just over two years ago, and since then, its New York presence has grown to three bustling studios, including the Hamptons. Recently, Barry’s also opened locations in Nashville, London, and Norway. (Yes, Norway.)

Barry's BootcampThe new Boston studio will debut on Chauncy Street in Downtown Crossing, in the heart of the city, and its grand opening is set for September 21. Miami Beach is slated for a November opening. “We have our sights set on all of the great urban markets,” says Barry’s Bootcamp CEO John Mumford.

He’s not kidding. Two locations are expected to debut in San Francisco as early as January 2014, and the company is in conversations with potential franchisees in Dallas and Austin. The owners of the Bergen, Norway, franchise are now eyeing Oslo and Stockholm, and Mumford says there’s “a lot of interest” in Dubai and Toronto.

The franchise model, which Barry’s only adopted recently, is one reason the brand has been able to grow quickly into new markets. (The company currently owns and operates about half of its studios; the other half are franchised.) “The critical thing is picking the right people to run them,” Mumford says. Plus, local owners are able to build their city’s vibe into the space, making sure the brand appeals to its residents. (New York, for example, was the first to get a Fuel Bar. We busy East Coasters have an appetite for smoothies!)

In addition to spreading out all over the globe, Barry’s is also renovating its LA studios and undergoing a brand makeover, which will be rolled out for the first time in Boston. “It’s going to simplify and update our look and improve it. It’s the next-generation look of Barry’s Bootcamp,” Mumford says.

Amid all of the changes, the brand will stay true to its efficient, sweat-producing, entertainment-packed, treadmill-and-weights method, which keeps most class goers coming back for more—and bringing friends. “The workout hasn’t changed, and we’ve really worked on developing communities,” Mumford says. “I think that’s why we have an advantage on big-box gyms.” —Lisa Elaine Held