We scouted the top fitness journals to help you crush your 2019 workout goals


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Way back in 2017, seemingly an eternity ago, I entered into a love triangle, splitting my gaze between the guy I was seeing and CrossFit. It wasn’t a relationship per se, but it was codependent, eager, and lustful in the way all Nicholas Sparks movies and soap operas are (rewatch and The Notebook or Dear John and then tell me I’m wrong).

We spent all of our time together: working out, debriefing our workouts, planning our next workouts, fueling for our workouts, and watching other people workout. Riveting, I know. Month after month, this went on and on, and I fell more and more in love with them both each day.

But then one day, said guy called it quits (for another girl at the gym, no less). I felt not only heartbroken and confused, but also like my relationship with CrossFit was in limbo, as well. Somewhere in the span of time we were seeing each other, my love for him had become indistinguishable from my love for CrossFit.

So, to actually get over my workout-buddy-slash-ex, I couldn’t just trudge through the emotional sludge and physical hurt of the break-up. I also needed to redefine my relationship with fitness, outside of him. Unsure of where to start, I called up my CrossFit coach Mike Ramirez, CF-L2, for advice. His number one suggestion? Start a fitness feelings journal.

“If you want to relate to fitness in a healthy and authentic way, then you need to connect to it mentally, emotionally, and spiritually as well,” says Mike Ramirez.

“If you want a relate to fitness in a healthy and authentic way, then you need to connect to it mentally, emotionally, and spiritually as well,” he told me. A fitness journal serves as a tool to keep you honest with yourself. It will show you where you started, where you have evolved, how you truly feel about fitness, and how you’re relating to it.”

To get the most out of the journal, Ramirez suggests simple prompts like: How did the workout make you feel? How is your body doing? What hurts? What should your focus be to fully recover? What made you feel powerful and strong? Are you feeling joy?  Over the course of few months, those prompts helped me answer complex questions that allowed me to figure out how I liked to exercise apart from my ex. It allowed me to tap into specific moves to understand what I actually liked to do and what I was doing because of leftover emotion from my relationship.

I’ll admit, I’m still not completely over my ex. And I miss the intimacy of having my partner in life be my partner in workouts. But the fitness journal helped me realize that my love of CrossFit can (and does!) exist outside of ex.

So even now, after every workout I use Ramirez’s suggestion—which he recommends to all exercisers (not just the heartbroken ones, lol). “Just as that surge of dopamine hits, and you’re high on the endorphins, allow yourself to freely write. Whatever comes to a your mind post training, write it down.”

While I prefer a blank-slate when I journal after working out, if you’re the type who likes more specific prompts, instructions, or charts, try one of these twelve fitness journals. Whether you’re trying to get over an ex, crush your 2019 fitness goals, or develop a healthy relationship to exercise, Ramirez says they can help you get there.

If you prefer to freestyle your ~fitness feelings~, like me,  here’s how to start a bullet journal. And while you’re organizing your life, check out these super-cute planners

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