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Brick says it is most definitely not closing


Photo: Brick New York Instagram
(Photo: Brick New York)

This week, the New York Post and Racked reported that massive Chelsea CrossFit box Brick New York had been ordered to shut down, but owner Jarett Perelmutter wants to set the record straight: the snatches will not stop.

“At no time did she [the judge] shut us down. She simply stated we needed a permit,” he says. “We will 100 percent undeniably and undoubtedly get the permit.” What permit? Good question.

For years, Brick has been fighting to get its Physical Culture Establishment permit approved, which is required in order to operate as a gym in New York City. But the process has been a long one because of a lawsuit related to noise complaints. Perelmutter acknowledges there have been issues with soundproofing, and that the original floor did not reduce noise and vibrations the way it was meant to.

Since then, he says, Brick has spent “upwards of a million dollars” making improvements to rectify the problem, like upgrading to an insulated ceiling that muffles sound. This week, they will complete the installation of a new floor, “which takes us above and beyond our necessary call of duty as a tenant,” he says.

They’ll find out if the permit is finally approved on February 10, but the lawsuit brought by residents in the condos above the gym may continue. “On numerous occasions my family and I have been woken up by the noises and vibrations emanating [from Brick],” a third-floor resident told the New York Post. “My family and I hear these sounds starting at 6:00 a.m. most days and then sporadically throughout the day.”

Perelmutter says the residents have been “aggressive” and unresponsive to the gym’s efforts to make improvements and be a good neighbor. “We are committed to fighting the lawsuit…because we know we’re in the right,” he says, citing the more than 900 members and 27 employees the gym serves. “It is the focus of Brick to be as positive of an asset to the community as we possibly can be.” In the meantime, if you stop by for a B|X class, please remember to put your giant kettlebell down gently. —Lisa Elaine Held

For more information, visit www.bricknewyork.com