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Your next job interview may include a serious sweat sesh—here’s why


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Photo: Unsplash/Noah Buscher

Imagine you get the call to schedule an interview for the job of your dreams. But, when you get to the office to meet your potential employer (dressed to professionally impress, no doubt), things take an unexpected turn for the…active. What would you do if you had to clip in at SoulCycle for a spin with a prospective boss as part of your interview? Because, it’s not a far-fetched nightmare.

According to a report out of Richmond, Virginia, such fitness-forward interviews are a very real thing. Health Warrior co-founder Nick Morris, for example, is already opting for this type of unconventional interview setting. Recently, he asked applicant Austin Harris to go for a jog with him, after which they engaged in a CrossFit-style workout.

“Seeing somebody outside their comfort zone and seeing how well they respond to whatever challenge it is gives you a little bit of knowledge about how they’re going to perform when they are, you know, having a difficult day.” —Nick Morris, Health Warrior co-founder

The purpose of this unexpected sweat sesh was not to gain insight into Harris’ physical capabilities, but rather to see how he responded to curveballs. “Seeing somebody outside their comfort zone and seeing how well they respond to whatever challenge it is gives you a little bit of knowledge about how they’re going to perform when they are, you know, having a difficult day,” Morris told Richmond’s NBC12. “I think you can learn a lot from these interviews that you can’t when you’re sitting in a suit across from a table.”

While Morris insisted that no potential employee would be forced to engage in physical activity, he and CEO Shane Emmett explained that the request does serve as a test of sorts to see if an interviewee is a good fit for the company, culturally.

Will such sweat-based “tryouts” become the modern-day equivalent of sharing a midday Scotch with Don Draper, so to speak? Only time will tell, but it might be wise to upgrade your activewear drawer, just in case.

Not sure how to land an interview in the first place? Here’s when to apply to best optimize your chances. Plus, here’s how to get promoted, even if you work remotely.