You May Also Like

running stories

Firsthand accounts of the most LOL-worthy bodily functions that happen while running

friendships goals

7 friends (total!) is all it takes for a happy life

Karlie Kloss

The perfect pair of leggings comes down to 3 things, according to Karlie Kloss

how to treat hangnails

Infected hangnails have met their match with *this* essential oil

hamstring flexibility

Can’t touch your toes? These two yoga moves will change that

The ballet barre exercises that made Jennifer Garner sore

Try the mini ballet barre series that even made Jennifer Garner sore

How to do Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn’s go-to core-strengthening move (or, in this case, lack thereof)


Thumbnail for How to do Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn’s go-to core-strengthening move (or, in this case, lack thereof)
Pin It
Photo: Instagram/@lindseyvonn

Highly decorated Olympian Lindsey Vonn might well be one best skiers in the world, but she gained her fair share of battle scars—concussions, fractures, ACL tears, and other injuries—along her journey to the top. Luckily, none of the ailments killed her competitive spirit, but instead fueled her to work even harder to gain the strength she needed. Her training for the PyeongChang Olympics included a specific core-strengthening move (or, in this case, lack thereof) to help stabilize her torso while heading down the slopes in order to keep her body safe.

The standing anti-rotation hold, Self reports, involves contracting the core and holding it totally still in a specific position, like a side plank.

“Anti-rotation movements are very good for anyone who wants to generate more power from their core and also perfect their form.” —trainer Andrew Schuth

“Anti-rotation movements are very good for anyone who wants to generate more power from their core and also perfect their form,” trainer Andrew Schuth told Self. “You may think that your core is just your abs, but it’s really an entire entity comprised of more than 20 different muscles, including your obliques—the muscles on the side of your stomach—and the deep muscles in your spine that wrap all the way around your midsection.”

To strengthen your abs, protect your body, and help you get more out of your other core exercises, give Vonn’s go-to move a try: According to The New York Times, her exact exercise involves grabbing a pulley (or a resistance band!) and holding 30 pounds of resistance for 30 to 60 seconds twice on each side of her body. “We call it ‘anti-rotation.’ The core is preventing rotation, so when she pushes that pulley out, it wants to pull her into the machine,” her trainer, Alex Bunt, said. Because of that, she has to use her core strength to stabilize herself against the pull.

But start small, resistance-wise, and work your way up to Vonn-level strength. You can’t beat a simple move that gives you great abs and simultaneously helps keep your body strong and injury-free.

Here’s how folding your workout clothes into spandex burritos could change your life. Also, find out how wellness pros get their workouts in while traveling.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

hamstring flexibility

Can’t touch your toes? These two yoga moves will change that

The ballet barre exercises that made Jennifer Garner sore

Try the mini ballet barre series that even made Jennifer Garner sore

Need an abs workout at home? Try Chelsea Handler's

Feel the burn while barely moving with this abs exercise from Chelsea Handler’s trainer

Self-lubricating condom effectiveness? High, if people use it

Meet the self-lubricating condom that promotes sexual health and peak friskiness

Karlie Kloss

The perfect pair of leggings comes down to 3 things, according to Karlie Kloss

Use the pomodoro technique to recharge while still working

The brilliantly simple method Olivia Culpo uses to recharge *while* still working