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This machine promises to help you do the perfect squat


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Many of us work out for the very-much-needed mental clarity and endorphin-fueled vibes. But for a certain subset of fitness addicts brought up in the Instagram age of before-and-after shots, it’s all about the physical results.

When streaming a workout on your laptop (sans amazing instructor to guide you IRL), though, it’s all too easy to miss the point entirely, form-wise. And of course, proper alignment is key to get the super toned look—otherwise known as #goals—all over social media.

That’s where DB Method comes in. Billed as the first-ever at-home machine designed to set up your body for the perfect squat, the aim—to be frank—is to tone and tighten your rear. (DB Method, which retails for $189, is actually short for Dream Butt Method.)

Seeing a gap in the exercise-machine market, founder Erika Rayman sought to attract results-oriented users who want the precious minutes they devote to working out to count—in a big way. And she gets it: Rayman worked long hours in business development, and used to try and squeeze lunges into her lunch-break. Fittingly, the machine folds up to fit under the bed or inside a closet, and it’s designed to be used for 15 minutes a day in five-minute intervals (all the more appeal for studio-apartment dwellers with crazy schedules).

So how does it work? The goal is to shift your body’s center of gravity, putting you in the ideal position to target your gluteus maximus—which also has the potential to decrease lower back pain. “Isolating the gluteus maximus, as The DB Method does, is an excellent way of reducing spinal stress and improving performance,” says Dan S. Cohen, MD, of The Spine Care Institute of Miami Beach.

The move also tightens your quads, hamstrings, calves, and back and shoulder muscles. If you’re curious how it use it, here’s the deal:

Photo: DB Method
Photo: DB Method

1. After adjusting to your height, place your feet on the black ramps on either side so your body weight rests fully in your heels.

2. Grip the handrails (arms should fully be extended), engage your core, and bring your shoulder blades together as if you’re sitting in a chair.

3. With your shoulder blades together, squeeze your glutes and lower body by pushing down on the seat (continue putting all of your weight on your heels) until you are in a low squat.

4. Slowly bring your body back up and repeat, doing slow and steady repetitions for five minutes.

5. Complete three five-minute sets per day for maximum results.

The idea is to create a full squat with great form—one that’s lightyears better than your less-than-committed attempts while binge-watching Gilmore Girls. So, are before-and-after DB Method photos about to pop up all over Instagram? Stay tuned.

To learn more about the DB Method, go to thedbmethod.com

Photos: DB Method