You May Also Like

USA gymnastics news: women are not being supported

Why can’t Team USA gymnasts (and all female athletes, for that matter) catch a break lately?

It's apple picking season, according to every Instagram post

I *think* it’s possible to go apple picking without Instagramming it—but had to check with an expert to be sure

yale happiness class

How to take Yale’s ultra-popular ‘The Science of Well-Being’ course online for zero dollars

Need a reason to spring for a natural-light-rich apartment? Fewer germs—seriously

More natural light in your home means fewer germs—seriously, science says so

The one ingredient to look for in your moisturizer

Moisturizers require this one ingredient to *really* benefit your skin

The anti-inflammatory ingredient Meghan Markle adds into her banana bread

The anti-inflammatory ingredient Meghan Markle adds to her banana bread

Winter travel inspo: Study says coastal and rural spots are best for your well-being


Thumbnail for Winter travel inspo: Study says coastal and rural spots are best for your well-being
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Jonathan Caramanus

The next time you’re planning a healthy trip, you might want to stay close to nature—but that doesn’t mean you should head to just any run-of-the-mill park. A new study found spending time in coastal or rural areas rather than cities (even if you hang out in urban green spaces) is much better for your well-being.

When researchers asked 4,500 participants to recall recent visits to different locations, they found those who traveled to places with more natural offerings felt much better psychologically than those who spent their time in city gardens and parks. Not only were coastal/rural wanderlusters more relaxed and refreshed, but they also felt more connected to nature than they did elsewhere—especially if their visits lasted more than 30 minutes.

“Nature can be beneficial to us, but we’re still exploring how and why. Our mental well-being and our emotional bond with nature may differ depending on the type and quality of an environment we visit.” —Kayleigh Wyles, PhD

“We’ve demonstrated for some time that nature can be beneficial to us, but we’re still exploring how and why. Here we have found that our mental well-being and our emotional bond with nature may differ depending on the type and quality of an environment we visit,” lead study author Kayleigh Wyles, PhD, said in a press release.

While heading to your city park is still a great way to get a breath of fresh air on a whim, it likely won’t give your mental health a boost quite like getting out into nature, without bright lights or concrete in sight. Whether you’re forest-bathing in California or going on a waterfall hike in Maine, go get lost in nature to sufficiently recharge.

Take this quiz to discover your perfect travel spot for recharging. Or, check out these travel destinations you should visit solo.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

A hip, low-back, and knee pain exercises and modifications guide

So you’ve got knee, hip, or low back pain? Here’s how to modify your workout accordingly

how to make a long candle last longer

The lighting solutions you need to burn every last bit of your cozy fall candles

Need a reason to spring for a natural-light-rich apartment? Fewer germs—seriously

More natural light in your home means fewer germs—seriously, science says so

How to make a healthy smoothie? Load up on veggies

The main ingredient in your smoothie actually shouldn’t be fruit, says one all-star dietitian

The anti-inflammatory ingredient Meghan Markle adds into her banana bread

The anti-inflammatory ingredient Meghan Markle adds to her banana bread

Chair Pose

Strengthen *every* muscle you need to nail your handstand with this chair pose variation