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This start-up wants to turn the US into a camping paradise


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Photo: Stocksy/Mickey Wiswedel

There are plenty of campgrounds you can visit to get a much-needed break away from it all, but untapped, breathtaking spots abound: An astounding estimated 60 percent of the US is privately owned, and one start-up wants to get ecologically minded campers on that land to not only better themselves, but the world, too.

Sure, spending time in beautiful, relatively untouched areas beats a campground surrounded by hundreds of other people any day (well, mostly when you’re jonesing for some solidarity). But Hipcamp‘s goal runs deeper: According to the company, by having people rent out privately-owned campsites, the landowners can keep their property undeveloped, which helps maintain wilderness habitats that allow plants and animals to thrive.

“We’re creating community across the political divide and the consistent geographical line that marks the split, usually between rural and urban.” —Alyssa Ravasio, Hipcamp CEO

“We’re creating community across the political divide and the consistent geographical line that marks the split, usually between rural and urban,” Alyssa Ravasio, Hipcamp CEO and founder, told Fast Company.

Whether you want to stay in a teepee in the mountains or in a tent underneath redwood trees, Hipcamp’s website lets you search for a spot (à la Airbnb) that will let you totally immerse yourself in nature for a fraction of the cost (as little as $25 for basic tent accommodations and up to $300 for a sprawling lodge). Helping the environment and getting away from all the hustle and bustle for the weekend? Sold.

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