Home Decor Ideas

This May Be the Only Couch You Need for the Rest of Your Life—No Matter Where You Move

Alexis Berger

Photo: Floyd; Graphic: W+G Creative
To me, the couch is the center of the home; in every place I’ve ever lived, I’ve spent most of my time in my living-room area. Whether hanging out with friends, enjoying a meal (yes, I love to eat dinner on the couch), or nursing my reality TV habit, there’s a pretty good chance that if I’m home, I’m parked on my sofa. So when I moved from New York City to Los Angeles without any furniture to my name, picking the perfect couch became a top priority. Ultimately, I landed on the Floyd Sectional—a sleek, low-profile, modular sofa that ticks all my boxes because it's designed with comfort, sustainability, and flexibility in mind.

The inspiration behind the Sectional, which launched in April 2021, was to suit customers of the brand (based in Detroit) who wanted more seating options than what its two-to-three–person sofa (from $1,595) offered. "Folks wanted something that could be configured to larger spaces, but also liked the idea of smaller chaise components standing alone,” says Kyle Hoff, Floyd co-founder and CEO. And that last need—the flexibility to change up their layouts should they want—is what made the modularity component of the Sectional key.

"Folks wanted something that could be configured to larger spaces, but also liked the idea of smaller chaise components standing alone.” —Kyle Hoff, Floyd co-founder and CEO.

On Floyd’s website, the Sectional comes in 14 different two-to-five-seat configurations and in five colors. All of those arrangements are created from nine distinct shapes, which can also be purchased à la carte to create infinite personalized setups. In fact, according to Hoff, the personalized option is most popular request the company receives. “We're seeing over 40 percent of customers build their own configuration to best suit their home versus buying the sets we modeled online,” Hoff says. “Among these orders, we've spotted some unexpected trends: For example, people are ditching the armrest for a more modern look, and a lot of customers are choosing configurations that have at least one side of their sectional open-ended with no armrest.”

The beauty here is that if people move into new homes (as many have during the pandemic) and the dimensions of their living spaces necessitate different seating needs—or they simply redecorate (as many also have during the pandemic)—the Floyd Sectional can grow and change with them. Beyond just the flexibility of configuration, modular sofas tend to be "much easier to disassemble, move, store, and install than traditional sofas, and typically they're of a lighter weight," says Los Angeles-based interior designer Lindsay Pennington. "I also like modular sofas for very active families whose priority is seating that is affordable, durable, and easily repurposed."

The Floyd Sectional

I have a three-piece Floyd Sectional ($2,310) made up of a right end piece, a middle piece, and a left-arm chaise, because that fits my current space. Should I ever move to a different home that could accommodate a larger sofa, I could add another middle seat and a corner seat and, voilà, I’d have a brand new piece of furniture without having to buy… well, an entire brand new couch. And, should I stay in my current space long enough to want to refresh the current layout, I may swap the right end piece with a right-side chaise, for a more modern look. I could then bring that extra right end piece to my home office, purchase a left end piece, and I’d have a brand new two-seat couch without, again, buying an entire brand new piece of furniture.

Of course, simply being able to have one couch to use for the rest of time doesn’t mean you’d want to do so, but with the Floyd Sectional, you can literally feel good about that intention. Its angled backrests meet up with seats so deep and thickly cushioned you’ll likely forget you’re on the couch and not a bed. In fact, Hoff says the cushions were designed with mattresses in mind, and are composed of “three densities of foam that allow you to sink in with support, softening, but never sagging, thanks to metal flat springs for suspension support.” Think: a hybrid foam-and-coil mattress.

It’s also designed to withstand all the life that happens around (and on) a couch—plus, it promises to do so sans toxic materials. “The Floyd Sectional is upholstered in a high-performance fabric that’s moisture-repellent, stain-resistant and easily cleaned, but contains no hazardous chemicals, like formaldehyde, flame retardants, or stain repellents with harmful [components],” says Hoff. “Utilizing nano-based technology woven directly into the yarn, spills bead up and sit on the fabric until they are gently blotted with a cloth for cleanup.” (For what it's worth, my toddler-aged niece has already put this durability product promise to the test, and it’s held up.)

From a sustainability standpoint, the Sectional is a win as well: The brand was born from a desire to help end a trend of what it calls "disposable furniture" and out of the belief that—as it claims on its homepage—“furniture should be made for the home, not the landfill.” The Sectional piece is testament to that intention, as it's made from ethically sourced materials and delivered to your home blanket-wrapped with minimal cardboard packaging.

And ultimately, why wouldn’t you want a super-comfortable, high-design, timeless couch that can shape-shift to fit in truly any space? Getting a new sofa in every new place you live is a pain point that fortunately now has a very comfortable solution.

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